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Title: Investigation of Room Temperature Oxidation of Cu in Air by Yoneda-XAFS

Abstract

The structure of thin copper oxide layers which are formed on metallic Cu due to the exposure to air are investigated with Yoneda-XAFS and ReflEXAFS. The measured Yoneda-XAFS data were compared to quantitative model calculations in the framework of the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) assuming different model structures for the oxide layer. Yoneda-XAFS fine structure spectra measured for various different grazing angles show that the experimental data are best described by a model structure consisting of a duplex type oxide layer with an outer layer of CuO (tenorite) in direct contact with the gas atmosphere and an inner Cu2O (cuprite) layer at the interface to the underlying Cu metal.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Faculty C - Department of Physics, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054662
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 882; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: XAFS13: 13. international conference on X-ray absorption fine structure, Stanford, CA (United States), 9-14 Jul 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2644569; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; COPPER; COPPER OXIDES; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DWBA; FINE STRUCTURE; INTERFACES; LAYERS; OXIDATION; REFLECTION; X RADIATION; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Keil, P., Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D., and Frahm, R. Investigation of Room Temperature Oxidation of Cu in Air by Yoneda-XAFS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2644569.
Keil, P., Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D., & Frahm, R. Investigation of Room Temperature Oxidation of Cu in Air by Yoneda-XAFS. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644569.
Keil, P., Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D., and Frahm, R. Fri . "Investigation of Room Temperature Oxidation of Cu in Air by Yoneda-XAFS". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644569.
@article{osti_21054662,
title = {Investigation of Room Temperature Oxidation of Cu in Air by Yoneda-XAFS},
author = {Keil, P. and Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D. and Frahm, R.},
abstractNote = {The structure of thin copper oxide layers which are formed on metallic Cu due to the exposure to air are investigated with Yoneda-XAFS and ReflEXAFS. The measured Yoneda-XAFS data were compared to quantitative model calculations in the framework of the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) assuming different model structures for the oxide layer. Yoneda-XAFS fine structure spectra measured for various different grazing angles show that the experimental data are best described by a model structure consisting of a duplex type oxide layer with an outer layer of CuO (tenorite) in direct contact with the gas atmosphere and an inner Cu2O (cuprite) layer at the interface to the underlying Cu metal.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2644569},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 882,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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