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Title: Dale Sayers' Scientific Legacy in North Carolina

Abstract

From the time he joined the NC State faculty in 1976 until his untimely death in 2004, Dale Sayers enthusiastically offered the strengths of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to colleagues with a wide variety of interests. A master collaborator. Dale teamed with researchers from disciplines as far ranging as solid state physics, biochemistry, electrical engineering, medicine and geology. In this talk, offered as a tribute to these efforts, I will highlight a small subset of Dale's many collaborations with other North Carolina faculty. The few cited examples chosen from a host of collaborations reveal the strength of Dale's science and the breadth of his vision. I will also tell of Dale's efforts to build a synchrotron on our campus in an effort that nearly succeeded despite ill-timed political adversity and ultimately tragic obstacles.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Physics Department North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054566
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 882; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: XAFS13: 13. international conference on X-ray absorption fine structure, Stanford, CA (United States), 9-14 Jul 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2644421; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; NORTH CAROLINA; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Paesler, M. A., and Washington, J. S. Dale Sayers' Scientific Legacy in North Carolina. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2644421.
Paesler, M. A., & Washington, J. S. Dale Sayers' Scientific Legacy in North Carolina. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644421.
Paesler, M. A., and Washington, J. S. Fri . "Dale Sayers' Scientific Legacy in North Carolina". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644421.
@article{osti_21054566,
title = {Dale Sayers' Scientific Legacy in North Carolina},
author = {Paesler, M. A. and Washington, J. S.},
abstractNote = {From the time he joined the NC State faculty in 1976 until his untimely death in 2004, Dale Sayers enthusiastically offered the strengths of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to colleagues with a wide variety of interests. A master collaborator. Dale teamed with researchers from disciplines as far ranging as solid state physics, biochemistry, electrical engineering, medicine and geology. In this talk, offered as a tribute to these efforts, I will highlight a small subset of Dale's many collaborations with other North Carolina faculty. The few cited examples chosen from a host of collaborations reveal the strength of Dale's science and the breadth of his vision. I will also tell of Dale's efforts to build a synchrotron on our campus in an effort that nearly succeeded despite ill-timed political adversity and ultimately tragic obstacles.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2644421},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 882,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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