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Title: Recent Developments in the Recovery of SNAP-DYN Technical Data Base

Abstract

SNAP-DYN was a concept for a multi-kilowatt class (i.e., 10 to 50 kWe) of space nuclear electric power systems based on the SNAP reactor, shield, and liquid metal heat transfer technologies developed in the 1960s and coupled with dynamic power conversion hardware and state of the art space radiator technologies. The basic concept minimized the system's development costs by utilizing established technologies for each of the major components within the power system to reduce its overall development schedule. Three power conversion technologies were evaluated for the SNAP-DYN concept including Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with a peak cycle temperature of 672 K, a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) with a peak cycle temperature of 906 K, and a free piston Stirling cycle (FPSC) with a peak cycle temperature of 870 K. Net system conversion efficiencies were estimated to range from 16 to 19 % over the 10 to 50 kWe power range. Specific power levels for these systems were estimated to range from 6.4 to 13 W/kg over the same power range. SNAP-DYN reactor thermal power levels varied from 55 to 260 kWt, but a much longer lifetime (5 to 10 years vs. 1.3 years) was being evaluated for this power systemmore » application than had been demonstrated in the 1960s SNAP reactor development program. The last SNAP reactor under development at the end of the program in 1973 was designed for a 5-year mission life at a nominal thermal power level of 110 kWt with a coolant outlet temperature capability of 922 K. This reactor technology formed the basis for the SNAP-DYN reactor concept.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Hamilton Sundstrand Rocketdyne SLS, CanogaPark, CA 91309 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054551
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 880; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: International forum-STAIF 2007: 11. conference on thermophysics applications in microgravity; 24. symposium on space nuclear power and propulsion; 5. conference on human/robotic technology and the vision for space exploration; 5. symposium on space colonization; 4. symposium on new frontiers and future concepts, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 11-15 Feb 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2437486; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; BRAYTON CYCLE; CONVERSION; COOLANTS; DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; FISSION; HEAT TRANSFER; LIQUID METALS; POWER SYSTEMS; RADIATORS; RANKINE CYCLE; REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; SHIELDS; SNAP REACTORS; SPACE PROPULSION REACTORS; SPACE VEHICLES; STIRLING CYCLE; NESDPS Office of Nuclear Energy Space and Defense Power Systems

Citation Formats

Determan, William R., and Grimmett, David. Recent Developments in the Recovery of SNAP-DYN Technical Data Base. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2437486.
Determan, William R., & Grimmett, David. Recent Developments in the Recovery of SNAP-DYN Technical Data Base. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2437486.
Determan, William R., and Grimmett, David. Tue . "Recent Developments in the Recovery of SNAP-DYN Technical Data Base". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2437486.
@article{osti_21054551,
title = {Recent Developments in the Recovery of SNAP-DYN Technical Data Base},
author = {Determan, William R. and Grimmett, David},
abstractNote = {SNAP-DYN was a concept for a multi-kilowatt class (i.e., 10 to 50 kWe) of space nuclear electric power systems based on the SNAP reactor, shield, and liquid metal heat transfer technologies developed in the 1960s and coupled with dynamic power conversion hardware and state of the art space radiator technologies. The basic concept minimized the system's development costs by utilizing established technologies for each of the major components within the power system to reduce its overall development schedule. Three power conversion technologies were evaluated for the SNAP-DYN concept including Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with a peak cycle temperature of 672 K, a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) with a peak cycle temperature of 906 K, and a free piston Stirling cycle (FPSC) with a peak cycle temperature of 870 K. Net system conversion efficiencies were estimated to range from 16 to 19 % over the 10 to 50 kWe power range. Specific power levels for these systems were estimated to range from 6.4 to 13 W/kg over the same power range. SNAP-DYN reactor thermal power levels varied from 55 to 260 kWt, but a much longer lifetime (5 to 10 years vs. 1.3 years) was being evaluated for this power system application than had been demonstrated in the 1960s SNAP reactor development program. The last SNAP reactor under development at the end of the program in 1973 was designed for a 5-year mission life at a nominal thermal power level of 110 kWt with a coolant outlet temperature capability of 922 K. This reactor technology formed the basis for the SNAP-DYN reactor concept.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2437486},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 880,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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