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Title: PID Control Effectiveness for Surface Reactor Concepts

Abstract

Control of space and surface fission reactors should be kept as simple as possible, because of the need for high reliability and the difficulty to diagnose and adapt to control system failures. Fortunately, compact, fast-spectrum, externally controlled reactors are very simple in operation. In fact, for some applications it may be possible to design low-power surface reactors without the need for any reactor control after startup; however, a simple proportional, integral, derivative (PID) controller can allow a higher performance concept and add more flexibility to system operation. This paper investigates the effectiveness of a PID control scheme for several anticipated transients that a surface reactor might experience. To perform these analyses, the surface reactor transient code FRINK was modified to simulate control drum movements based on bulk coolant temperature.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4]
  1. North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States)
  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054542
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 880; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: International forum-STAIF 2007: 11. conference on thermophysics applications in microgravity; 24. symposium on space nuclear power and propulsion; 5. conference on human/robotic technology and the vision for space exploration; 5. symposium on space colonization; 4. symposium on new frontiers and future concepts, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 11-15 Feb 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2437463; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CONTROL; CONTROL SYSTEMS; COOLANTS; DESIGN; F CODES; FAILURES; FISSION; FLEXIBILITY; PERFORMANCE; POWER SYSTEMS; REACTOR INSTRUMENTATION; REACTOR OPERATION; RELIABILITY; SPACE; SPACE VEHICLES; SURFACES; TRANSIENTS

Citation Formats

Dixon, David D., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, Marsh, Christopher L., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, and Poston, David I. PID Control Effectiveness for Surface Reactor Concepts. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2437463.
Dixon, David D., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, Marsh, Christopher L., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, & Poston, David I. PID Control Effectiveness for Surface Reactor Concepts. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2437463.
Dixon, David D., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, Marsh, Christopher L., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, and Poston, David I. Tue . "PID Control Effectiveness for Surface Reactor Concepts". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2437463.
@article{osti_21054542,
title = {PID Control Effectiveness for Surface Reactor Concepts},
author = {Dixon, David D. and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Marsh, Christopher L. and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Poston, David I.},
abstractNote = {Control of space and surface fission reactors should be kept as simple as possible, because of the need for high reliability and the difficulty to diagnose and adapt to control system failures. Fortunately, compact, fast-spectrum, externally controlled reactors are very simple in operation. In fact, for some applications it may be possible to design low-power surface reactors without the need for any reactor control after startup; however, a simple proportional, integral, derivative (PID) controller can allow a higher performance concept and add more flexibility to system operation. This paper investigates the effectiveness of a PID control scheme for several anticipated transients that a surface reactor might experience. To perform these analyses, the surface reactor transient code FRINK was modified to simulate control drum movements based on bulk coolant temperature.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2437463},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 880,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}