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Title: A Wide Range Neutron Detector for Space Nuclear Reactor Applications

Abstract

We propose here a versatile and innovative solution for monitoring and controlling a space-based nuclear reactor that is based on technology already proved in ground based reactors. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) allows for a reduction in the complexity of space based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. A ground model, predecessor of the proposed system, has been installed and is operating at the OPAL (Open Pool Advanced Light Water Research Reactor) in Australia, providing long term functional data. A space compatible Engineering Qualification Model of the WRND has been developed, manufactured and verified satisfactorily by analysis, and is currently under environmental testing.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. INVAP S.E., Moreno 1089, 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro, (Argentina)
  2. SOLYDES, Chiclana 220, 1832 Lomas de Zamora, Buenos Aires (Argentina)
  3. PAYLOAD SYSTEMS Inc., 247 Third Street, Cambridge, MA 02141 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054538
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 880; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: International forum-STAIF 2007: 11. conference on thermophysics applications in microgravity; 24. symposium on space nuclear power and propulsion; 5. conference on human/robotic technology and the vision for space exploration; 5. symposium on space colonization; 4. symposium on new frontiers and future concepts, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 11-15 Feb 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2437455; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; AUSTRALIA; CONTROL SYSTEMS; FISSION; MONITORING; NEUTRON DETECTION; NEUTRON DETECTORS; REACTOR INSTRUMENTATION; RESEARCH REACTORS; SPACE; TESTING; WATER

Citation Formats

Nassif, Eduardo, Sismonda, Miguel, Matatagui, Emilio, and Pretorius, Stephan. A Wide Range Neutron Detector for Space Nuclear Reactor Applications. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2437455.
Nassif, Eduardo, Sismonda, Miguel, Matatagui, Emilio, & Pretorius, Stephan. A Wide Range Neutron Detector for Space Nuclear Reactor Applications. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2437455.
Nassif, Eduardo, Sismonda, Miguel, Matatagui, Emilio, and Pretorius, Stephan. Tue . "A Wide Range Neutron Detector for Space Nuclear Reactor Applications". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2437455.
@article{osti_21054538,
title = {A Wide Range Neutron Detector for Space Nuclear Reactor Applications},
author = {Nassif, Eduardo and Sismonda, Miguel and Matatagui, Emilio and Pretorius, Stephan},
abstractNote = {We propose here a versatile and innovative solution for monitoring and controlling a space-based nuclear reactor that is based on technology already proved in ground based reactors. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) allows for a reduction in the complexity of space based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. A ground model, predecessor of the proposed system, has been installed and is operating at the OPAL (Open Pool Advanced Light Water Research Reactor) in Australia, providing long term functional data. A space compatible Engineering Qualification Model of the WRND has been developed, manufactured and verified satisfactorily by analysis, and is currently under environmental testing.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2437455},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 880,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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