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Title: Microspectroscopy Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron

Abstract

This dedicated beamline will provide sub-micron spatial resolution with the highest flux possible and an energy tuning range of 4.7-25 keV using an in-vacuum undulator source. It will combine 2D mapping with {mu}-XRF, {mu}-XANES and {mu}-XAFS for elemental and chemical analysis to solve scientific problems that can only be understood using sub-micron resolutions. The primary beamline design goal is to achieve sub-micron spatial resolution, 100-200 nm, at energy resolutions approaching 1/10000. This spatial resolution will be achieved without a major compromise to the flux, as the beamline will simultaneously achieve detection sensitivities to sub-ppm levels. The beamline will have the flexibility to trade-off one parameter against gains in certain attributes, as dictated by the needs of the application. Fresnel zone plates are intended for the highest resolution applications, while the KB mirrors are shall be used for applications where achromatic focusing and high sensitivity are required. The beamline design will accommodate a diverse range of applications with greatly contrasting sample formats, sample composition and anticipated detector count rates.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Australian Synchrotron, Clayton VIC (Australia)
  2. ANSTO, Menai NSW (Australia)
  3. CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Clayton VIC (Australia)
  4. (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21052655
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436197; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; BEAM PRODUCTION; COUNTING RATES; DESIGN; ENERGY RESOLUTION; FINE STRUCTURE; FOCUSING; GAIN; KEV RANGE; MIRRORS; PHOTON BEAMS; SENSITIVITY; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; WIGGLER MAGNETS; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Paterson, D. J., Boldeman, J. W., Cohen, D. D., Ryan, C. G., and Physics Department, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC. Microspectroscopy Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436197.
Paterson, D. J., Boldeman, J. W., Cohen, D. D., Ryan, C. G., & Physics Department, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC. Microspectroscopy Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436197.
Paterson, D. J., Boldeman, J. W., Cohen, D. D., Ryan, C. G., and Physics Department, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC. Fri . "Microspectroscopy Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436197.
@article{osti_21052655,
title = {Microspectroscopy Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron},
author = {Paterson, D. J. and Boldeman, J. W. and Cohen, D. D. and Ryan, C. G. and Physics Department, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC},
abstractNote = {This dedicated beamline will provide sub-micron spatial resolution with the highest flux possible and an energy tuning range of 4.7-25 keV using an in-vacuum undulator source. It will combine 2D mapping with {mu}-XRF, {mu}-XANES and {mu}-XAFS for elemental and chemical analysis to solve scientific problems that can only be understood using sub-micron resolutions. The primary beamline design goal is to achieve sub-micron spatial resolution, 100-200 nm, at energy resolutions approaching 1/10000. This spatial resolution will be achieved without a major compromise to the flux, as the beamline will simultaneously achieve detection sensitivities to sub-ppm levels. The beamline will have the flexibility to trade-off one parameter against gains in certain attributes, as dictated by the needs of the application. Fresnel zone plates are intended for the highest resolution applications, while the KB mirrors are shall be used for applications where achromatic focusing and high sensitivity are required. The beamline design will accommodate a diverse range of applications with greatly contrasting sample formats, sample composition and anticipated detector count rates.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436197},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Owing to its extreme sensitivity, quantitative mapping of elemental distributionsviaX-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has become a key microanalytical technique. The recent realisation of scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXDM) meanwhile provides an avenue for quantitative super-resolved ultra-structural visualization. The similarity of their experimental geometries indicates excellent prospects for simultaneous acquisition. Here, in both step- and fly-scanning modes, robust, simultaneous XFM-SXDM is demonstrated.
  • We outline key design features for a versatile imaging and hard X-ray beamline for operation at the Australian Synchrotron. Special attention is paid to the implementation of in-line phase-contrast imaging using both the plane-wave and spherical-wave cases.
  • In the last years we witnessed an increasing trend in miniaturization of electronic, mechanical, optical and magnetic components. Currently, the ultimate Critical Dimension (CD) of such components is rapidly approaching the 10 nm length scale, with a growing interest in integrating different components in complex systems. Advanced fabrication techniques are thus required to rapidly pattern substrates on the 10-100 nm length scale, and soft X-Ray Lithography (XRL) has proven its patterning ability down to 40 nm, with the possibility to be further extended. The construction and commissioning of the Australia Synchrotron, that will be operational in 2007, gives the possibilitymore » to build such a facility on a powerful third-generation synchrotron source. This work is a comparative study of three possible beamlines devoted to XRL, one of which could be installed at the Australian Synchrotron. The optical layout and the thermal load have been studied, under the constraints given by the storage ring, the ultimate patterning ability, the current mask technology and two possible exposure stations, aiming at replicating structures in the sub-100 nm level. Ray tracing simulations have been performed in order to assess the optical layout and the performances of the beamlines, which in principle can cover a wide lithographic window between 1 and 8 keV incoming photon energy.« less
  • A horizontally driven beam extraction mirror will be used to collect 58 (h) x 17 (v) milliradians of infrared radiation from the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. Both bending magnet radiation and edge radiation will be collected, and the beam separated equally between two endstations operating a mid infrared microspectrometer and a far infrared high resolution spectrometer.
  • A beamline for high resolution powder diffraction studies will be installed as one of the first operational beamlines at the Australian Synchrotron and will be located on a bending magnet source. The beamline will be cable of using energies of 4-30 keV and comprise two end stations. The optical and end station design and performance specifications are presented.