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Title: Energy Dispersive X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Beamline Results and Opportunities

Abstract

ID24 is the energy dispersive beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility dedicated to X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Since 2000, a complete refurbishment program has started, including source upgrade, mirrors replacement, polychromator optimization and detection improvements. These have made possible the development of new applications in a variety of different fields, ranging from the measurement of tiny atom displacements to time resolved techniques, from measurements under extreme conditions to micro-XAS studies.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)
  2. (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21052625
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436170; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ATOMIC DISPLACEMENTS; BEAM PRODUCTION; EUROPEAN SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FACILITY; MIRRORS; OPTIMIZATION; PHOTON BEAMS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; TIME RESOLUTION; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Mathon, O., Aquilanti, G., Guilera, G., Newton, M. A., Trapananti, A., Pascarelli, S., Munoz, M., and LGCA, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Beamline Results and Opportunities. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436170.
Mathon, O., Aquilanti, G., Guilera, G., Newton, M. A., Trapananti, A., Pascarelli, S., Munoz, M., & LGCA, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Beamline Results and Opportunities. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436170.
Mathon, O., Aquilanti, G., Guilera, G., Newton, M. A., Trapananti, A., Pascarelli, S., Munoz, M., and LGCA, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble. Fri . "Energy Dispersive X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Beamline Results and Opportunities". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436170.
@article{osti_21052625,
title = {Energy Dispersive X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Beamline Results and Opportunities},
author = {Mathon, O. and Aquilanti, G. and Guilera, G. and Newton, M. A. and Trapananti, A. and Pascarelli, S. and Munoz, M. and LGCA, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble},
abstractNote = {ID24 is the energy dispersive beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility dedicated to X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Since 2000, a complete refurbishment program has started, including source upgrade, mirrors replacement, polychromator optimization and detection improvements. These have made possible the development of new applications in a variety of different fields, ranging from the measurement of tiny atom displacements to time resolved techniques, from measurements under extreme conditions to micro-XAS studies.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436170},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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