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Title: Soft X-Ray Scattering End Station

Abstract

This end station has been specially engineered to solve the problem of the limited optical access typically associated with magnetic fields and synchrotron radiation measurement stations. An octupole magnet provides a fully variable direction vector field. A cryogenically cooled manipulation transfer system is provides the necessary flexibility to address a wide variety of magnetic samples. The whole system is ultra high vacuum compatible with a base pressure of 5 x 10 -10 mbar. The eight water-cooled magnets, spaced equidistantly over the surface of a sphere, allow the application of the field in any direction. These high current magnets generate a field in the area of the sample of 1T. A photodiode detector travels along a +/- 90 [deg] arc perpendicular to the beam axis. This motion, coupled with the entire system rotation of +/- 90 [deg] and incoming light polarization allows for the diode to be placed anywhere on a hemisphere perpendicular to the beam for any light polarization. The system also has provisions for cooling the sample with LHe and sample positioning in X, Y, Z, and rotation about the Z axis with micron resolution.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States)
  2. MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21052571
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436115; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BEAM PRODUCTION; FLEXIBILITY; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETS; OCTUPOLES; PHOTON BEAMS; POLARIZATION; RESOLUTION; ROTATION; SOFT X RADIATION; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Kulesza, Joe, Johnson, Eric, Lyndaker, Aaron, Deyhim, Alex, Jayne, Richard, and Dunn, Jonathan Hunter. Soft X-Ray Scattering End Station. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436115.
Kulesza, Joe, Johnson, Eric, Lyndaker, Aaron, Deyhim, Alex, Jayne, Richard, & Dunn, Jonathan Hunter. Soft X-Ray Scattering End Station. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436115.
Kulesza, Joe, Johnson, Eric, Lyndaker, Aaron, Deyhim, Alex, Jayne, Richard, and Dunn, Jonathan Hunter. Fri . "Soft X-Ray Scattering End Station". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436115.
@article{osti_21052571,
title = {Soft X-Ray Scattering End Station},
author = {Kulesza, Joe and Johnson, Eric and Lyndaker, Aaron and Deyhim, Alex and Jayne, Richard and Dunn, Jonathan Hunter},
abstractNote = {This end station has been specially engineered to solve the problem of the limited optical access typically associated with magnetic fields and synchrotron radiation measurement stations. An octupole magnet provides a fully variable direction vector field. A cryogenically cooled manipulation transfer system is provides the necessary flexibility to address a wide variety of magnetic samples. The whole system is ultra high vacuum compatible with a base pressure of 5 x 10 -10 mbar. The eight water-cooled magnets, spaced equidistantly over the surface of a sphere, allow the application of the field in any direction. These high current magnets generate a field in the area of the sample of 1T. A photodiode detector travels along a +/- 90 [deg] arc perpendicular to the beam axis. This motion, coupled with the entire system rotation of +/- 90 [deg] and incoming light polarization allows for the diode to be placed anywhere on a hemisphere perpendicular to the beam for any light polarization. The system also has provisions for cooling the sample with LHe and sample positioning in X, Y, Z, and rotation about the Z axis with micron resolution.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436115},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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