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Title: The Infrared Microspectroscopy Beamline at CAMD

Abstract

The first infrared microspectroscopy beamline at the Louisiana State University, Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (LSU-CAMD) has been constructed and dedicated to investigation of samples from various disciplines including chemistry, geology, biology, and material sciences. The beamline comprises a simple optical configuration. A planar and toroidal mirror pair collects 50 and 15 mrad synchrotron radiation in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, and focuses the beam through a diamond window located outside of the shielding wall. This focus acts as a new source point for the rest of the optical systems. The synchrotron beam spot size of 35 {mu}m and 12 {mu}m is measured in the x and y direction of the sample stage position of the microscope. This small beam spot has a superior brightness compared to conventional IR sources and allows spatially resolved measurements with very good signal/noise ratio. Compared to a conventional thermal source, synchrotron radiation provides 30 times better intensity and a two orders of magnitude greater signal/noise ratio when measuring with microscope aperture size of 15 x 15 {mu}m{sup 2}. The results of the studies on the fungus-plant interaction with its resultant effects on the healthy leaves, and bacterial growth process in the crystallization ofmore » gordaite, a mineral, are presented.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806 (United States)
  2. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21049348
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436409; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; BEAM POSITION; CRYSTALLIZATION; FUNGI; INFRARED SPECTRA; LEAVES; MICROSTRUCTURE; OPTICAL SYSTEMS; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION

Citation Formats

Kizilkaya, O., Singh, V., Desta, Y., Pease, M., Roy, A., Scott, J., Goettert, J., Morikawa, E., Hormes, J., Prange, A., and Microbiology and Food Hygiene, Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences. The Infrared Microspectroscopy Beamline at CAMD. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436409.
Kizilkaya, O., Singh, V., Desta, Y., Pease, M., Roy, A., Scott, J., Goettert, J., Morikawa, E., Hormes, J., Prange, A., & Microbiology and Food Hygiene, Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences. The Infrared Microspectroscopy Beamline at CAMD. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436409.
Kizilkaya, O., Singh, V., Desta, Y., Pease, M., Roy, A., Scott, J., Goettert, J., Morikawa, E., Hormes, J., Prange, A., and Microbiology and Food Hygiene, Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences. Fri . "The Infrared Microspectroscopy Beamline at CAMD". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436409.
@article{osti_21049348,
title = {The Infrared Microspectroscopy Beamline at CAMD},
author = {Kizilkaya, O. and Singh, V. and Desta, Y. and Pease, M. and Roy, A. and Scott, J. and Goettert, J. and Morikawa, E. and Hormes, J. and Prange, A. and Microbiology and Food Hygiene, Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences},
abstractNote = {The first infrared microspectroscopy beamline at the Louisiana State University, Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (LSU-CAMD) has been constructed and dedicated to investigation of samples from various disciplines including chemistry, geology, biology, and material sciences. The beamline comprises a simple optical configuration. A planar and toroidal mirror pair collects 50 and 15 mrad synchrotron radiation in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, and focuses the beam through a diamond window located outside of the shielding wall. This focus acts as a new source point for the rest of the optical systems. The synchrotron beam spot size of 35 {mu}m and 12 {mu}m is measured in the x and y direction of the sample stage position of the microscope. This small beam spot has a superior brightness compared to conventional IR sources and allows spatially resolved measurements with very good signal/noise ratio. Compared to a conventional thermal source, synchrotron radiation provides 30 times better intensity and a two orders of magnitude greater signal/noise ratio when measuring with microscope aperture size of 15 x 15 {mu}m{sup 2}. The results of the studies on the fungus-plant interaction with its resultant effects on the healthy leaves, and bacterial growth process in the crystallization of gordaite, a mineral, are presented.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436409},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The first infrared (IR) beamline at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) at Louisiana State University has been successfully constructed and commissioned. The beamline features a simple optical design with a minimal number of optical components. A pair of mirrors, planar and toroidal, is utilized for extracting synchrotron radiation (50 and 15 mrad, in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively) from the bending magnet port to a diamond window located outside of the shielding wall. Synchrotron radiation is then collimated by an off-axis parabolic mirror and fed into a Thermo Nicolet Continuum microscope through a Thermo Nicolet Nexus 670more » FT-IR spectrometer. The microscope's performances with synchrotron-radiation and conventional-thermal sources were compared in the mid-IR spectral range (11 700-400 cm{sup -1}). Effective beam spot size at sample position of the microscope was measured to be 35x12 {mu}m{sup 2} (FWHM). It was also determined that synchrotron radiation has substantial advantages over the conventional thermal source: {approx}30 times better intensity and {approx}100 times better S/N at aperture size of the microscope smaller than 15x15 {mu}m{sup 2}. This performance allows infrared spectroscopy analysis in a small area with a diffraction-limited spatial resolution.« less
  • A varied-line-space plane-grating monochromator for the energy range of 200 - 1,200 eV is described as an upgrade of the CAMD plane-grating monochromator. Ray-tracing calculations indicate performance improvements in both resolving power and throughput. An increase in resolving power from ca. 3,000 to the range (from low to high energy) 28,000 - 8,000 throughput increase of 50 - 400% are expected. In contrast to the large enhancement of performance, the proposed modification is relatively inexpensive because of extensive utilization of the current beamline components.
  • A new tomography beamline has been built and commissioned at the 7 T wiggler of the CAMD storage ring. This beamline is equipped with two monochromators that can be used interchangeably for X-ray absorption spectroscopy or high resolution X-ray tomography, at best 2-3 {mu}m pixel size. The high-flux double multilayer-mirror monochromator (W-B4C multilayers) can be used in the energy range from 6 to 35 keV with a resolution ({delta}E/E ) between 0.01-0.03. The second is a channel-cut Si(311)-crystal monochromator with a range of 15 to 36 keV and resolution of ca. 10-4, this is not yet tested. Tomography has themore » potential for high-throughput materials analysis; however, there are some significant obstacles to be overcome in the areas of data acquisition, reconstruction, visualization and analysis. Data acquisition is facilitated by the multilayer monochromator as this provides high photon flux, thus reducing measurement time. At the beamline, Matlab(c) routines provide simple x,y,z fly-throughs of the sample. Off-beamline processing with Amira(c) can yield more sophisticated inspection of the sample. Standard data acquisition based on fixed angle increments is not optimal, however, new patterns based on Greek golden ratio angle increments offer faster convergence to a high signal-to-noise-ratio image. The image reconstruction has traditionally been done by back-projection reconstruction. In this presentation we will show first results from samples studied at the new beamline.« less
  • This paper describes a new monochromator design for a bending magnet beamline of the Swiss Light Source synchrotron facility. The beamline optics is based on a horizontally deflecting spherical grating monochromator (SGM) with two gratings at a constant deviation angle. It covers a photon energy range from 200 eV to 1000 eV. This paper concentrates on the original flexure-based mechanisms with partially parallel kinematics invented and designed for this monochromator, as well as on the lessons learned from the assembly and testing of the system.
  • This dedicated beamline will provide sub-micron spatial resolution with the highest flux possible and an energy tuning range of 4.7-25 keV using an in-vacuum undulator source. It will combine 2D mapping with {mu}-XRF, {mu}-XANES and {mu}-XAFS for elemental and chemical analysis to solve scientific problems that can only be understood using sub-micron resolutions. The primary beamline design goal is to achieve sub-micron spatial resolution, 100-200 nm, at energy resolutions approaching 1/10000. This spatial resolution will be achieved without a major compromise to the flux, as the beamline will simultaneously achieve detection sensitivities to sub-ppm levels. The beamline will have themore » flexibility to trade-off one parameter against gains in certain attributes, as dictated by the needs of the application. Fresnel zone plates are intended for the highest resolution applications, while the KB mirrors are shall be used for applications where achromatic focusing and high sensitivity are required. The beamline design will accommodate a diverse range of applications with greatly contrasting sample formats, sample composition and anticipated detector count rates.« less