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Title: Microreactor Cells for High-Throughput X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

Abstract

High-throughput experimentation has been applied to X-ray Absorption spectroscopy as a novel route for increasing research productivity in the catalysis community. Suitable instrumentation has been developed for the rapid determination of the local structure in the metal component of precursors for supported catalysts. An automated analytical workflow was implemented that is much faster than traditional individual spectrum analysis. It allows the generation of structural data in quasi-real time. We describe initial results obtained from the automated high throughput (HT) data reduction and analysis of a sample library implemented through the 96 well-plate industrial standard. The results show that a fully automated HT-XAS technology based on existing industry standards is feasible and useful for the rapid elucidation of geometric and electronic structure of materials.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5]
  1. School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, P.O. Box 88. Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)
  2. School of Chemistry, University of Southhampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)
  3. Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)
  4. Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)
  5. (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21049342
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436403; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; CATALYSIS; CATALYSTS; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; METALS; PLATES; PRODUCTIVITY; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Beesley, Angela, Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos, Weiher, Norbert, Tromp, Moniek, Evans, John, Dent, Andy, Harvey, Ian, Schroeder, Sven L. M., and School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, P.O. Box 88. Manchester, M60 1QD. Microreactor Cells for High-Throughput X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436403.
Beesley, Angela, Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos, Weiher, Norbert, Tromp, Moniek, Evans, John, Dent, Andy, Harvey, Ian, Schroeder, Sven L. M., & School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, P.O. Box 88. Manchester, M60 1QD. Microreactor Cells for High-Throughput X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436403.
Beesley, Angela, Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos, Weiher, Norbert, Tromp, Moniek, Evans, John, Dent, Andy, Harvey, Ian, Schroeder, Sven L. M., and School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, P.O. Box 88. Manchester, M60 1QD. Fri . "Microreactor Cells for High-Throughput X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436403.
@article{osti_21049342,
title = {Microreactor Cells for High-Throughput X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy},
author = {Beesley, Angela and Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos and Weiher, Norbert and Tromp, Moniek and Evans, John and Dent, Andy and Harvey, Ian and Schroeder, Sven L. M. and School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, P.O. Box 88. Manchester, M60 1QD},
abstractNote = {High-throughput experimentation has been applied to X-ray Absorption spectroscopy as a novel route for increasing research productivity in the catalysis community. Suitable instrumentation has been developed for the rapid determination of the local structure in the metal component of precursors for supported catalysts. An automated analytical workflow was implemented that is much faster than traditional individual spectrum analysis. It allows the generation of structural data in quasi-real time. We describe initial results obtained from the automated high throughput (HT) data reduction and analysis of a sample library implemented through the 96 well-plate industrial standard. The results show that a fully automated HT-XAS technology based on existing industry standards is feasible and useful for the rapid elucidation of geometric and electronic structure of materials.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436403},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
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