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Title: State-of-the-Art Facilities for Industrial Applications on BM29 and ID24 at the ESRF

Abstract

BM29 and ID24 are two independent but complementary beamlines at the ESRF dedicated to X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The implementation of new state-of-the-art facilities, specially on ID24, devoted to homeogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, material science and solid-state chemistry has attracted industries and academic users from all over the world. Here we present some of the activities carried out on these beamlines.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble CEDEX (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21049313
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436356; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; BEAM PRODUCTION; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; EUROPEAN SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FACILITY; HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS; IMPLEMENTATION; SOLIDS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; X RADIATION; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Guilera, Gemma, Newton, Mark, Mathon, Olivier, Gorges, Bernard, and Pascarelli, Sakura. State-of-the-Art Facilities for Industrial Applications on BM29 and ID24 at the ESRF. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436356.
Guilera, Gemma, Newton, Mark, Mathon, Olivier, Gorges, Bernard, & Pascarelli, Sakura. State-of-the-Art Facilities for Industrial Applications on BM29 and ID24 at the ESRF. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436356.
Guilera, Gemma, Newton, Mark, Mathon, Olivier, Gorges, Bernard, and Pascarelli, Sakura. Fri . "State-of-the-Art Facilities for Industrial Applications on BM29 and ID24 at the ESRF". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436356.
@article{osti_21049313,
title = {State-of-the-Art Facilities for Industrial Applications on BM29 and ID24 at the ESRF},
author = {Guilera, Gemma and Newton, Mark and Mathon, Olivier and Gorges, Bernard and Pascarelli, Sakura},
abstractNote = {BM29 and ID24 are two independent but complementary beamlines at the ESRF dedicated to X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The implementation of new state-of-the-art facilities, specially on ID24, devoted to homeogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, material science and solid-state chemistry has attracted industries and academic users from all over the world. Here we present some of the activities carried out on these beamlines.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436356},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The ID20 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is presented with its main present characteristics and future directions. A few side experimental techniques are also presented that have highlighted the versatility of the diffractometer and the high quality of the optics. Nearly 7 years of continuous operation have also demonstrated unavoidable limitations that the on-going upgrading of the beamline aims to overcome. The main features of this and related projects are described.
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  • Mercuric Iodide (HgI/sub 2/) has been recognized as the best room temperature solid-state, X-ray detection material presently available. While the detection performance of Mercuric Iodide is not as good as liquid nitrogen cooled Si(Li) or Germanium it is already good enough to meet the requirements of several special applications where the simplicity and convenience of room temperature operation are important. The high atomic numbers of Hg and I (80, 53) enable efficient absorption of radiation, and the wide band gap (2.13 eV versus 1.12 eV for silicon) allows operation at room temperature without any significant thermal noise. Poor hole collection,more » resulting from deep hole trapping centers, is the main limitation in the use of HgI/sub 2/ for high energy (>60 keV) gamma-ray detection, but fortunately this is not a problem for detecting the 5--20 keV X-radiation normally used in crystallography. These lower energy X-rays are absorbed within a few microns of the negative electrode and so the holes do not contribute significantly to the pulse. In such cases, very good energy resolution can be obtained. The present performance characteristics for detection of X-rays: i.e., good energy resolution, long-term stability, and the lack of polarization effects: open a wide range of applications for HgI/sub 2/ detectors. This paper will focus on the different methods used to grow HgI/sub 2/ crystals and on how the method of growth is reflected in detector performance. The state of the art of HgI/sub 2/ detector capabilities is discussed and several of the most attractive applications are pointed out.« less