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Title: Picosecond Diffraction at the ESRF: How Far Have We Come and Where Are We Going?

Abstract

The realization of solution phase pump-probe diffraction experiments on beamline ID09B is described. The pink beam from a low-K in-vacuum undulator is used to study the structural dynamics of small molecules in solution to 100 picosecond time resolution and at atomic resolution. The X-ray chopper and the associated timing modes of the synchrotron are described. The dissociation of molecular iodine in liquid CCl4 is studied by single pulse diffraction. The data probe not only the iodine structures but also the solvent structure as the latter is thermally excited by the flow of energy from recombining iodine atoms. The low-q part of the diffraction spectra is a sensitive probe of the hydrodynamics of the solvent as a function of time.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]; ;  [4];  [5]
  1. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, Grenoble 38043 (France)
  2. Laboratory for Chemical Physics, NIDDK, Building 5, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-0520 (United States)
  3. Groupe Matiere Condensee et Materiaux, Bat 11A, UMR CNRS 6626, Universite de Rennes I, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France)
  4. Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Gu-seong-dong, Yu-sung-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)
  5. Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet KonstanzUniversitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Constance (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21049234
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436276; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ATOMS; CARBON TETRACHLORIDE; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; DISSOCIATION; EUROPEAN SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FACILITY; IODINE; MOLECULES; PULSES; SOLVENTS; SYNCHROTRONS; TIME DEPENDENCE; TIME RESOLUTION; WIGGLER MAGNETS; X RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Wulff, Michael, Kong Qingyu, Cammarata, Marco, Lo Russo, Manuela, Anfinrud, Philip, Schotte, Friedrich, Lorenc, Maciej, Ihee, Hyotcherl, Kim, Tae Kyu, and Plech, Anton. Picosecond Diffraction at the ESRF: How Far Have We Come and Where Are We Going?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436276.
Wulff, Michael, Kong Qingyu, Cammarata, Marco, Lo Russo, Manuela, Anfinrud, Philip, Schotte, Friedrich, Lorenc, Maciej, Ihee, Hyotcherl, Kim, Tae Kyu, & Plech, Anton. Picosecond Diffraction at the ESRF: How Far Have We Come and Where Are We Going?. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436276.
Wulff, Michael, Kong Qingyu, Cammarata, Marco, Lo Russo, Manuela, Anfinrud, Philip, Schotte, Friedrich, Lorenc, Maciej, Ihee, Hyotcherl, Kim, Tae Kyu, and Plech, Anton. Fri . "Picosecond Diffraction at the ESRF: How Far Have We Come and Where Are We Going?". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436276.
@article{osti_21049234,
title = {Picosecond Diffraction at the ESRF: How Far Have We Come and Where Are We Going?},
author = {Wulff, Michael and Kong Qingyu and Cammarata, Marco and Lo Russo, Manuela and Anfinrud, Philip and Schotte, Friedrich and Lorenc, Maciej and Ihee, Hyotcherl and Kim, Tae Kyu and Plech, Anton},
abstractNote = {The realization of solution phase pump-probe diffraction experiments on beamline ID09B is described. The pink beam from a low-K in-vacuum undulator is used to study the structural dynamics of small molecules in solution to 100 picosecond time resolution and at atomic resolution. The X-ray chopper and the associated timing modes of the synchrotron are described. The dissociation of molecular iodine in liquid CCl4 is studied by single pulse diffraction. The data probe not only the iodine structures but also the solvent structure as the latter is thermally excited by the flow of energy from recombining iodine atoms. The low-q part of the diffraction spectra is a sensitive probe of the hydrodynamics of the solvent as a function of time.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436276},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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