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Title: Resonance Raman Spectroscopy for In-Situ Monitoring of Radiation Damage

Abstract

Radiation induced damage of metal centres in proteins is a severe problem in X-ray structure determination. Photoreduction can lead to erroneous structural implications, and in the worst cases cause structure solution to fail. Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy is well suited in-situ monitoring of X-ray induced photoreduction. However the laser excitation needed for RR can itself cause photoreduction of the metal centres. In the present study myoglobin and rubredoxin crystals were used as model systems to assess the feasibility of using RR for this application. It is shown that at least 10-15 RR spectra per crystal can be recorded at low laser power before severe photoreduction occurs. Furthermore it is possible to collect good quality RR spectra from cryocooled protein crystals with exposure times of only a few seconds. Following extended laser illumination photoreduction is observed through the formation and decay of spectral bands as a function of dose. The experimental setup planned for integration into the SLS protein crystallography beamlines is also described. This setup should also prove to be very useful for other experimental techniques at synchrotrons where X-ray photoreduction is a problem e.g. X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];
  1. Swiss Light Source at PSI, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)
  2. Technische Universitaet Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21043414
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436464; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; DOSES; EXCITATION; MYOGLOBIN; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATION MONITORING; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; RESONANCE; RUBREDOXIN; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; X RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Meents, A., Owen, R. L., Schneider, R., Pradervand, C., Schulze-Briese, C., Murgida, D., Hildebrandt, P., and Bohler, P. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy for In-Situ Monitoring of Radiation Damage. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436464.
Meents, A., Owen, R. L., Schneider, R., Pradervand, C., Schulze-Briese, C., Murgida, D., Hildebrandt, P., & Bohler, P. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy for In-Situ Monitoring of Radiation Damage. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436464.
Meents, A., Owen, R. L., Schneider, R., Pradervand, C., Schulze-Briese, C., Murgida, D., Hildebrandt, P., and Bohler, P. Fri . "Resonance Raman Spectroscopy for In-Situ Monitoring of Radiation Damage". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436464.
@article{osti_21043414,
title = {Resonance Raman Spectroscopy for In-Situ Monitoring of Radiation Damage},
author = {Meents, A. and Owen, R. L. and Schneider, R. and Pradervand, C. and Schulze-Briese, C. and Murgida, D. and Hildebrandt, P. and Bohler, P},
abstractNote = {Radiation induced damage of metal centres in proteins is a severe problem in X-ray structure determination. Photoreduction can lead to erroneous structural implications, and in the worst cases cause structure solution to fail. Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy is well suited in-situ monitoring of X-ray induced photoreduction. However the laser excitation needed for RR can itself cause photoreduction of the metal centres. In the present study myoglobin and rubredoxin crystals were used as model systems to assess the feasibility of using RR for this application. It is shown that at least 10-15 RR spectra per crystal can be recorded at low laser power before severe photoreduction occurs. Furthermore it is possible to collect good quality RR spectra from cryocooled protein crystals with exposure times of only a few seconds. Following extended laser illumination photoreduction is observed through the formation and decay of spectral bands as a function of dose. The experimental setup planned for integration into the SLS protein crystallography beamlines is also described. This setup should also prove to be very useful for other experimental techniques at synchrotrons where X-ray photoreduction is a problem e.g. X-ray absorption spectroscopy.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436464},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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