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Title: X-ray Tomography and Chemical Imaging within Butterfly Wing Scales

Abstract

The rainbow like color of butterfly wings is associated with the internal and surface structures of the wing scales. While the photonic structure of the scales is believed to diffract specific lights at different angle, there is no adequate probe directly answering the 3-D structures with sufficient spatial resolution. The NSRRC nano-transmission x-ray microscope (nTXM) with tens nanometers spatial resolution is able to image biological specimens without artifacts usually introduced in sophisticated sample staining processes. With the intrinsic deep penetration of x-rays, the nTXM is capable of nondestructively investigating the internal structures of fragile and soft samples. In this study, we imaged the structure of butterfly wing scales in 3-D view with 60 nm spatial resolution. In addition, synchrotron-radiation-based Fourier transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy was employed to analyze the chemical components with spatial information of the butterfly wing scales. Based on the infrared spectral images, we suggest that the major components of scale structure were rich in protein and polysaccharide.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21043403
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436453; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COLOR; FOURIER TRANSFORMATION; IMAGES; INFRARED SPECTRA; MICROSCOPY; NANOSTRUCTURES; POLYSACCHARIDES; PROTEINS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; TOMOGRAPHY; TRANSMISSION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Chen Jianhua, Lee Yaochang, Tang, M.-T., and Song Yenfang. X-ray Tomography and Chemical Imaging within Butterfly Wing Scales. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436453.
Chen Jianhua, Lee Yaochang, Tang, M.-T., & Song Yenfang. X-ray Tomography and Chemical Imaging within Butterfly Wing Scales. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436453.
Chen Jianhua, Lee Yaochang, Tang, M.-T., and Song Yenfang. Fri . "X-ray Tomography and Chemical Imaging within Butterfly Wing Scales". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436453.
@article{osti_21043403,
title = {X-ray Tomography and Chemical Imaging within Butterfly Wing Scales},
author = {Chen Jianhua and Lee Yaochang and Tang, M.-T. and Song Yenfang},
abstractNote = {The rainbow like color of butterfly wings is associated with the internal and surface structures of the wing scales. While the photonic structure of the scales is believed to diffract specific lights at different angle, there is no adequate probe directly answering the 3-D structures with sufficient spatial resolution. The NSRRC nano-transmission x-ray microscope (nTXM) with tens nanometers spatial resolution is able to image biological specimens without artifacts usually introduced in sophisticated sample staining processes. With the intrinsic deep penetration of x-rays, the nTXM is capable of nondestructively investigating the internal structures of fragile and soft samples. In this study, we imaged the structure of butterfly wing scales in 3-D view with 60 nm spatial resolution. In addition, synchrotron-radiation-based Fourier transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy was employed to analyze the chemical components with spatial information of the butterfly wing scales. Based on the infrared spectral images, we suggest that the major components of scale structure were rich in protein and polysaccharide.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436453},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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