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Title: 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis

Abstract

The first observation of micro papillary (MP) breast cancer by x-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) and the first observation of the 3D x-ray internal structure of another breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), are reported. The specimen size for the sheet-shaped MP was 26 mm x 22 mm x 2.8 mm, and that for the rod-shaped DCIS was 3.6 mm in diameter and 4.7 mm in height. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory, KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. We achieved a high-contrast x-ray image by adopting a thickness-controlled transmission-type angular analyzer that allows only refraction components from the object for 2D imaging. This provides a high-contrast image of cancer-cell nests, cancer cells and stroma. For x-ray 3D imaging, a new algorithm due to the refraction for x-ray CT was created. The angular information was acquired by x-ray optics diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The number of data was 900 for each reconstruction. A reconstructed CT image may include ductus lactiferi, micro calcification and the breast gland. This modality has the possibility to open up a new clinical and pathological diagnosis using x-ray, offering more precise inspection and detection of early signs of breast cancer.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Institute of Science and Technology, Tokyo Univ. of Science, Yamasaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
  3. Dept. of Breast-Thyroid-Endocrine Surgery, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan) (and others)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21043393
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436443; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ALGORITHMS; CARCINOMAS; CAT SCANNING; DIAGNOSIS; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; JAPANESE ORGANIZATIONS; MAMMARY GLANDS; OPTICS; PHOTONS; REFRACTION; X RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Ando, Masami, Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801, Dept. of Photo-Science, GUAS, Shonan, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193, Bando, Hiroko, and Ueno, Ei. 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436443.
Ando, Masami, Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801, Dept. of Photo-Science, GUAS, Shonan, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193, Bando, Hiroko, & Ueno, Ei. 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436443.
Ando, Masami, Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801, Dept. of Photo-Science, GUAS, Shonan, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193, Bando, Hiroko, and Ueno, Ei. Fri . "2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436443.
@article{osti_21043393,
title = {2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis},
author = {Ando, Masami and Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 and Dept. of Photo-Science, GUAS, Shonan, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 and Bando, Hiroko and Ueno, Ei},
abstractNote = {The first observation of micro papillary (MP) breast cancer by x-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) and the first observation of the 3D x-ray internal structure of another breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), are reported. The specimen size for the sheet-shaped MP was 26 mm x 22 mm x 2.8 mm, and that for the rod-shaped DCIS was 3.6 mm in diameter and 4.7 mm in height. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory, KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. We achieved a high-contrast x-ray image by adopting a thickness-controlled transmission-type angular analyzer that allows only refraction components from the object for 2D imaging. This provides a high-contrast image of cancer-cell nests, cancer cells and stroma. For x-ray 3D imaging, a new algorithm due to the refraction for x-ray CT was created. The angular information was acquired by x-ray optics diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The number of data was 900 for each reconstruction. A reconstructed CT image may include ductus lactiferi, micro calcification and the breast gland. This modality has the possibility to open up a new clinical and pathological diagnosis using x-ray, offering more precise inspection and detection of early signs of breast cancer.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436443},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.