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Title: Structure Refinement Based on Inverse Fourier Analysis in X-Ray Fluorescence Holography

Abstract

A new reconstruction technique for X-ray fluorescence hologram data was proposed based on extractions of holographic oscillations from single scatterers within a sample. The extractions were iteratively carried out by the inverse Fourier transformation of selected atomic images, which were obtained by the Fourier transformation of one-dimensional hologram averaged over azimuth about a given polar axis in k-space. The refinement of the real space reconstruction was performed using the measured holograms and the extracted holographic oscillations. I applied this data processing to the theoretical holograms of fcc Au cluster at 12.0, 12.5 and 13.0 keV, and successfully obtained clear atomic image without artifacts.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21043383
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436433; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; DATA PROCESSING; FCC LATTICES; FLUORESCENCE; FOURIER ANALYSIS; FOURIER TRANSFORMATION; GOLD; HOLOGRAPHY; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; KEV RANGE; SOLID CLUSTERS; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Hayashi, K. Structure Refinement Based on Inverse Fourier Analysis in X-Ray Fluorescence Holography. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436433.
Hayashi, K. Structure Refinement Based on Inverse Fourier Analysis in X-Ray Fluorescence Holography. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436433.
Hayashi, K. Fri . "Structure Refinement Based on Inverse Fourier Analysis in X-Ray Fluorescence Holography". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436433.
@article{osti_21043383,
title = {Structure Refinement Based on Inverse Fourier Analysis in X-Ray Fluorescence Holography},
author = {Hayashi, K.},
abstractNote = {A new reconstruction technique for X-ray fluorescence hologram data was proposed based on extractions of holographic oscillations from single scatterers within a sample. The extractions were iteratively carried out by the inverse Fourier transformation of selected atomic images, which were obtained by the Fourier transformation of one-dimensional hologram averaged over azimuth about a given polar axis in k-space. The refinement of the real space reconstruction was performed using the measured holograms and the extracted holographic oscillations. I applied this data processing to the theoretical holograms of fcc Au cluster at 12.0, 12.5 and 13.0 keV, and successfully obtained clear atomic image without artifacts.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436433},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a promising tool for determing the local structures around specified elements. To obtain accurate interatomic distances, we applied inverse Fourier analysis, which has often been used to investigate extended x-ray absorption fine structures, to multiple energy x-ray holograms. The interatomic distances of neighboring atoms around a fluorescing atom were estimated from the 16 experimental holograms of a Au single crystal and most of them were in good agreement with the actual values within an error of 0.3%. The use of inverse Fourier analysis improves the XFH for the evaluation of quantitative local lattice distortion aroundmore » impurities in single crystals.« less
  • We compare x-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) and multiple-energy x-ray holography (MEXH), two techniques that have recently been used to obtain experimental three-dimensional atomic images. For single-energy holograms, these methods are equivalent by virtue of the optical reciprocity theorem. However, XFH can only record holographic information at the characteristic fluorescence energies of the emitting species, while MEXH can record holographic information at any energy above the fluorescent edge of the emitter, thus enabling the suppression of real-twin overlaps and other aberrations and artifacts in atomic images. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • We consider from a theoretical viewpoint the direct imaging of atoms at and near the surfaces of solids by both x-ray-fluorescence holography (XFH) and electron-emission holography (EEH). The more ideal nature of x-ray scattering makes XFH images superior to those in single-energy EEH. The overlap of real and twin features for pairs of atoms at [plus minus]a can cause their XFH or EEH atomic images to cancel for certain combinations of wave vector and [vert bar]a[vert bar]. The relative merits of XFH and EEH for structure studies are considered.
  • Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is used to derive the differential cross sections measured in the three new experimental internal source ensemble x-ray holographies: bremsstrahlung (BXH), fluorescence (XFH), and multiple-energy (MEXH) x-ray holography. The polarization dependence of the BXH cross section is also obtained. For BXH, we study analytically and numerically the possible effects of the virtual photons and electrons which enter QED calculations in summing over the intermediate states. For the low photon and electron energies used in the current experiments, we show that the virtual intermediate states produce only very small effects. This is because the uncertainty principle limits themore » distance that the virtual particles can propagate to be much shorter than the separation between the regions of high electron density in the adjacent atoms. We also find that using the asymptotic form of the scattering wave function causes about a 5{endash}10{percent} error for near forward scattering. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}« less