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Title: Involved-Field, Low-Dose Chemoradiotherapy for Early-Stage Anal Carcinoma

Abstract

Purpose: To report the results of patients with early-stage anal cancer treated using a low-dose, reduced-volume, involved-field chemoradiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2006, 21 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 15 fractions within 3 weeks) and concurrent chemotherapy (bolus mitomycin-C 12 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 to a maximum of 20 mg followed by infusion 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h on Days 1-4). Of the 21 patients, 18 underwent small-volume, involved-field radiotherapy and 3 were treated with anteroposterior-posteroanterior parallel-opposed pelvic fields. Of the 21 patients, 17 had had lesions that were excised with close (<1 mm) or involved margins, 1 had had microinvasive disease on biopsy, and 3 had had macroscopic tumor <2 cm in diameter (T1). All were considered to have Stage N0 disease radiologically. Results: After a median follow-up of 42 months, only 1 patient (4.7%) had experienced local recurrence and has remained disease free after local excision. No distant recurrences or deaths occurred. Only 1 patient could not complete treatment (because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity). Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (9.5%). No significant late toxicity was identified. Conclusion: The results of our studymore » have shown that for patients with anal carcinoma who have residual microscopic or very-small-volume disease, a policy of low-dose, reduced-volume, involved-field chemoradiotherapy produces excellent local control and disease-free survival, with low rates of acute and late toxicity.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Leeds Cancer Centre, Cookridge Hospital, Leeds, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)
  2. Leeds Cancer Centre, Cookridge Hospital, Leeds, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom), E-mail: david.sebag-montefiore@leedsth.nhs.uk
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21039749
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.072; PII: S0360-3016(07)03684-X; Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0360-3016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; CHEMOTHERAPY; COMBINED THERAPY; DOSES; MAGNESIUM 20; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; URACILS

Citation Formats

Hatfield, Paul, Cooper, Rachel, and Sebag-Montefiore, David. Involved-Field, Low-Dose Chemoradiotherapy for Early-Stage Anal Carcinoma. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.072.
Hatfield, Paul, Cooper, Rachel, & Sebag-Montefiore, David. Involved-Field, Low-Dose Chemoradiotherapy for Early-Stage Anal Carcinoma. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.072.
Hatfield, Paul, Cooper, Rachel, and Sebag-Montefiore, David. Fri . "Involved-Field, Low-Dose Chemoradiotherapy for Early-Stage Anal Carcinoma". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.072.
@article{osti_21039749,
title = {Involved-Field, Low-Dose Chemoradiotherapy for Early-Stage Anal Carcinoma},
author = {Hatfield, Paul and Cooper, Rachel and Sebag-Montefiore, David},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To report the results of patients with early-stage anal cancer treated using a low-dose, reduced-volume, involved-field chemoradiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2006, 21 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 15 fractions within 3 weeks) and concurrent chemotherapy (bolus mitomycin-C 12 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 to a maximum of 20 mg followed by infusion 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h on Days 1-4). Of the 21 patients, 18 underwent small-volume, involved-field radiotherapy and 3 were treated with anteroposterior-posteroanterior parallel-opposed pelvic fields. Of the 21 patients, 17 had had lesions that were excised with close (<1 mm) or involved margins, 1 had had microinvasive disease on biopsy, and 3 had had macroscopic tumor <2 cm in diameter (T1). All were considered to have Stage N0 disease radiologically. Results: After a median follow-up of 42 months, only 1 patient (4.7%) had experienced local recurrence and has remained disease free after local excision. No distant recurrences or deaths occurred. Only 1 patient could not complete treatment (because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity). Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (9.5%). No significant late toxicity was identified. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that for patients with anal carcinoma who have residual microscopic or very-small-volume disease, a policy of low-dose, reduced-volume, involved-field chemoradiotherapy produces excellent local control and disease-free survival, with low rates of acute and late toxicity.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.072},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
issn = {0360-3016},
number = 2,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {2}
}