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Title: Property rights regimes to optimize natural resource use - future CBM development and sustainability

Abstract

Property rights regimes that promote sustainable development in the context of coalbed methane (CBM) exploration and production recognize and optimize the value of multiple natural resources including minerals, water, flora, and fauna. Institutional mechanisms that account for and mitigate both the short- and long-term external impacts from CBM development promote sustainability. The long-term potential for a vibrant recreational and tourist economy on a particular landscape may be compromised by overly shortsighted mineral resource extraction.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada). Dept. of Economics
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21036923
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Natural Resources Journal; Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; PROPERTY RIGHTS; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; METHANE; COAL SEAMS; EXPLORATION; PRODUCTION; OPTIMIZATION; LAND USE

Citation Formats

Eaton, C., Ingelson, A., and Knopff, R. Property rights regimes to optimize natural resource use - future CBM development and sustainability. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Eaton, C., Ingelson, A., & Knopff, R. Property rights regimes to optimize natural resource use - future CBM development and sustainability. United States.
Eaton, C., Ingelson, A., and Knopff, R. Sun . "Property rights regimes to optimize natural resource use - future CBM development and sustainability". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21036923,
title = {Property rights regimes to optimize natural resource use - future CBM development and sustainability},
author = {Eaton, C. and Ingelson, A. and Knopff, R.},
abstractNote = {Property rights regimes that promote sustainable development in the context of coalbed methane (CBM) exploration and production recognize and optimize the value of multiple natural resources including minerals, water, flora, and fauna. Institutional mechanisms that account for and mitigate both the short- and long-term external impacts from CBM development promote sustainability. The long-term potential for a vibrant recreational and tourist economy on a particular landscape may be compromised by overly shortsighted mineral resource extraction.},
doi = {},
journal = {Natural Resources Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 47,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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