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Title: Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations

Abstract

Purpose: To develop a minimally invasive surgical technique to access the midline and anterior skull base using the optical and technical advantages of robotic surgical instrumentation. Methods and Materials: Ten experimental procedures focusing on approaches to the nasopharynx, clivus, sphenoid, pituitary sella, and suprasellar regions were performed on one cadaver and one live mongrel dog. Both the cadaver and canine procedures were performed in an approved training facility using the da Vinci Surgical Robot. For the canine experiments, a transoral robotic surgery (TORS) approach was used, and for the cadaver a newly developed combined cervical-transoral robotic surgery (C-TORS) approach was investigated and compared with standard TORS. The ability to access and dissect tissues within the various areas of the midline and anterior skull base were evaluated, and techniques to enhance visualization and instrumentation were developed. Results: Standard TORS approaches did not provide adequate access to the midline and anterior skull base; however, the newly developed C-TORS approach was successful in providing the surgical access to these regions of the skull base. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is an exciting minimally invasive approach to the skull base that warrants continued preclinical investigation and development.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States), E-mail: bert.omalley@uphs.upenn.edu
  2. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21036285
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 69; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: Inaugural multidisciplinary head and neck cancer symposium, Rancho Mirage, CA (United States), 18-20 Jan 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.028; PII: S0360-3016(07)01035-8; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DOGS; PHARYNX; ROBOTS; SKULL; SURGERY

Citation Formats

O'Malley, Bert W., and Weinstein, Gregory S.. Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.028.
O'Malley, Bert W., & Weinstein, Gregory S.. Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.028.
O'Malley, Bert W., and Weinstein, Gregory S.. Mon . "Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.028.
@article{osti_21036285,
title = {Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations},
author = {O'Malley, Bert W. and Weinstein, Gregory S.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To develop a minimally invasive surgical technique to access the midline and anterior skull base using the optical and technical advantages of robotic surgical instrumentation. Methods and Materials: Ten experimental procedures focusing on approaches to the nasopharynx, clivus, sphenoid, pituitary sella, and suprasellar regions were performed on one cadaver and one live mongrel dog. Both the cadaver and canine procedures were performed in an approved training facility using the da Vinci Surgical Robot. For the canine experiments, a transoral robotic surgery (TORS) approach was used, and for the cadaver a newly developed combined cervical-transoral robotic surgery (C-TORS) approach was investigated and compared with standard TORS. The ability to access and dissect tissues within the various areas of the midline and anterior skull base were evaluated, and techniques to enhance visualization and instrumentation were developed. Results: Standard TORS approaches did not provide adequate access to the midline and anterior skull base; however, the newly developed C-TORS approach was successful in providing the surgical access to these regions of the skull base. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is an exciting minimally invasive approach to the skull base that warrants continued preclinical investigation and development.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.06.028},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 69,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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