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Title: Early black hole signals at the LHC

Abstract

The production of mini black holes due to large extra dimensions is a speculative but possible scenario. We survey estimates for di-jet suppression, and multi-mono-jet emission due to black hole production. We further look for a possible sub-scenario which is the formation of a stable or meta-stable black hole remnant (BHR). We show that the beauty of such objects is, that they are relatively easy to observe, even in the early phase of LHC running.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe--Universitaet, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)
  2. Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)
  3. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21036060
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 947; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 7. Latin American symposium on nuclear physics and applications, Cusco (Peru), 11-16 Jun 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2813834; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BLACK HOLES; CERN LHC; EMISSION; JET MODEL; PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION; PARTICLE PRODUCTION; STANDARD MODEL

Citation Formats

Koch, Ben, Bleicher, Marcus, Stoecker, Horst, and FIAS-Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Max von Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt. Early black hole signals at the LHC. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2813834.
Koch, Ben, Bleicher, Marcus, Stoecker, Horst, & FIAS-Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Max von Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt. Early black hole signals at the LHC. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2813834.
Koch, Ben, Bleicher, Marcus, Stoecker, Horst, and FIAS-Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Max von Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt. 2007. "Early black hole signals at the LHC". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2813834.
@article{osti_21036060,
title = {Early black hole signals at the LHC},
author = {Koch, Ben and Bleicher, Marcus and Stoecker, Horst and FIAS-Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Max von Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt},
abstractNote = {The production of mini black holes due to large extra dimensions is a speculative but possible scenario. We survey estimates for di-jet suppression, and multi-mono-jet emission due to black hole production. We further look for a possible sub-scenario which is the formation of a stable or meta-stable black hole remnant (BHR). We show that the beauty of such objects is, that they are relatively easy to observe, even in the early phase of LHC running.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2813834},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 947,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month =
}
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