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Title: The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation

Abstract

The potential of bone marrow cell-derived immature dendritic cells (myeloid iDCs) in modulating the efficacy of retinal cell transplantation therapy was investigated. (1) In vitro, myeloid iDCs but not BMCs enhanced the survival and proliferation of embryonic retinal cells, and the expression of various neurotrophic factors by myeloid iDCs was confirmed with RT-PCR. (2) In subretinal transplantation, neonatal retinal cells co-transplanted with myeloid iDCs showed higher survival rate compared to those transplanted without myeloid iDCs. (3) CD8 T-cells reactive against donor retinal cells were significantly increased in the mice with transplantation of retinal cells alone. These results suggested the beneficial effects of the use of myeloid iDCs in retinal cell transplantation therapy.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [1]
  1. Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)
  2. Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, 2-2-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)
  3. Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, 2-2-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan), E-mail: mmandai@cdb.riken.jp
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21032972
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 363; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.08.152; PII: S0006-291X(07)01841-4; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BONE MARROW CELLS; CELL PROLIFERATION; DENDRITES; IMMUNITY; IN VITRO; MICE; POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Oishi, Akio, Nagai, Takayuki, Mandai, Michiko, Takahashi, Masayo, and Yoshimura, Nagahisa. The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.08.152.
Oishi, Akio, Nagai, Takayuki, Mandai, Michiko, Takahashi, Masayo, & Yoshimura, Nagahisa. The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.08.152.
Oishi, Akio, Nagai, Takayuki, Mandai, Michiko, Takahashi, Masayo, and Yoshimura, Nagahisa. Fri . "The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.08.152.
@article{osti_21032972,
title = {The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation},
author = {Oishi, Akio and Nagai, Takayuki and Mandai, Michiko and Takahashi, Masayo and Yoshimura, Nagahisa},
abstractNote = {The potential of bone marrow cell-derived immature dendritic cells (myeloid iDCs) in modulating the efficacy of retinal cell transplantation therapy was investigated. (1) In vitro, myeloid iDCs but not BMCs enhanced the survival and proliferation of embryonic retinal cells, and the expression of various neurotrophic factors by myeloid iDCs was confirmed with RT-PCR. (2) In subretinal transplantation, neonatal retinal cells co-transplanted with myeloid iDCs showed higher survival rate compared to those transplanted without myeloid iDCs. (3) CD8 T-cells reactive against donor retinal cells were significantly increased in the mice with transplantation of retinal cells alone. These results suggested the beneficial effects of the use of myeloid iDCs in retinal cell transplantation therapy.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.08.152},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 363,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 16 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Nov 16 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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