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Title: Weakly interacting dark matter particle of a minimal technicolor theory

Abstract

We consider the possibility that a massive fourth family neutrino, predicted by a recently proposed minimal technicolor theory, could be the source of the dark matter in the Universe. The model has two techniflavors in the adjoint representation of a SU(2) techicolor gauge group and its consistency requires the existence of a fourth family of leptons. By a suitable hypercharge assignment the techniquarks together with the new leptons look like a conventional fourth standard model family. We show that the new (Majorana) neutrino N can be the dark matter particle if m{sub N}{approx}100-500 GeV and the expansion rate of the Universe at early times is dominated by an energy component scaling as {rho}{sub {phi}}{approx}a{sup -6} (kination), with {rho}{sub {phi}}/{rho}{sub rad}{approx}10{sup -6} during the nucleosynthesis era.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)
  2. (Finland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21020415
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.085003; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COLOR MODEL; GEV RANGE; HYPERCHARGE; NEUTRINOS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; NUCLEOSYNTHESIS; STANDARD MODEL; SU-2 GROUPS; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Kainulainen, Kimmo, Tuominen, Kimmo, Virkajaervi, Jussi, and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki. Weakly interacting dark matter particle of a minimal technicolor theory. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.085003.
Kainulainen, Kimmo, Tuominen, Kimmo, Virkajaervi, Jussi, & Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki. Weakly interacting dark matter particle of a minimal technicolor theory. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.085003.
Kainulainen, Kimmo, Tuominen, Kimmo, Virkajaervi, Jussi, and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki. Sun . "Weakly interacting dark matter particle of a minimal technicolor theory". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.085003.
@article{osti_21020415,
title = {Weakly interacting dark matter particle of a minimal technicolor theory},
author = {Kainulainen, Kimmo and Tuominen, Kimmo and Virkajaervi, Jussi and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki},
abstractNote = {We consider the possibility that a massive fourth family neutrino, predicted by a recently proposed minimal technicolor theory, could be the source of the dark matter in the Universe. The model has two techniflavors in the adjoint representation of a SU(2) techicolor gauge group and its consistency requires the existence of a fourth family of leptons. By a suitable hypercharge assignment the techniquarks together with the new leptons look like a conventional fourth standard model family. We show that the new (Majorana) neutrino N can be the dark matter particle if m{sub N}{approx}100-500 GeV and the expansion rate of the Universe at early times is dominated by an energy component scaling as {rho}{sub {phi}}{approx}a{sup -6} (kination), with {rho}{sub {phi}}/{rho}{sub rad}{approx}10{sup -6} during the nucleosynthesis era.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.085003},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 8,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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