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Title: Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations

Abstract

We study the geometry and dynamics of both isolated and dynamical trapping horizons by considering the allowed variations of their foliating two-surfaces. This provides a common framework that may be used to consider both their possible evolutions and their deformations as well as derive the well-known flux laws. Using this framework, we unify much of what is already known about these objects as well as derive some new results. In particular we characterize and study the 'almost isolated' trapping horizons known as slowly evolving horizons. It is for these horizons that a dynamical first law holds and this is analogous and closely related to the Hawking-Hartle formula for event horizons.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, A1C 5S7 (Canada)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21020388
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.084019; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COSMOLOGY; DEFORMATION; GEOMETRY; QUANTUM FIELD THEORY; SURFACES; TRAPPING; VARIATIONS

Citation Formats

Booth, Ivan, Fairhurst, Stephen, and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53201. Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.084019.
Booth, Ivan, Fairhurst, Stephen, & Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53201. Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.084019.
Booth, Ivan, Fairhurst, Stephen, and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53201. Sun . "Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.084019.
@article{osti_21020388,
title = {Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations},
author = {Booth, Ivan and Fairhurst, Stephen and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53201},
abstractNote = {We study the geometry and dynamics of both isolated and dynamical trapping horizons by considering the allowed variations of their foliating two-surfaces. This provides a common framework that may be used to consider both their possible evolutions and their deformations as well as derive the well-known flux laws. Using this framework, we unify much of what is already known about these objects as well as derive some new results. In particular we characterize and study the 'almost isolated' trapping horizons known as slowly evolving horizons. It is for these horizons that a dynamical first law holds and this is analogous and closely related to the Hawking-Hartle formula for event horizons.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.084019},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 8,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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