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Title: Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources

Abstract

New boundary conditions are imposed on the familiar cylindrical gravitational wave vacuum spacetimes. The new spacetime family represents cylindrical waves in a flat expanding (Kasner) universe. Space sections are flat and nonconical where the waves have not reached and wave amplitudes fall off more rapidly than they do in Einstein-Rosen solutions, permitting a more regular null inifinity.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284-2000 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21020380
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.084011; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; AMPLITUDES; BOUNDARY CONDITIONS; COSMOLOGY; EINSTEIN FIELD EQUATIONS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; SPACE; SPACE-TIME; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Gowdy, Robert H., and Edmonds, B. Douglas. Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.084011.
Gowdy, Robert H., & Edmonds, B. Douglas. Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.084011.
Gowdy, Robert H., and Edmonds, B. Douglas. Sun . "Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.084011.
@article{osti_21020380,
title = {Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources},
author = {Gowdy, Robert H. and Edmonds, B. Douglas},
abstractNote = {New boundary conditions are imposed on the familiar cylindrical gravitational wave vacuum spacetimes. The new spacetime family represents cylindrical waves in a flat expanding (Kasner) universe. Space sections are flat and nonconical where the waves have not reached and wave amplitudes fall off more rapidly than they do in Einstein-Rosen solutions, permitting a more regular null inifinity.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.084011},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 8,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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