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Title: Enhanced cosmological GRB rates and implications for cosmogenic neutrinos

Abstract

Gamma-ray bursts, which are among the most violent events in the Universe, are one of the few viable candidates to produce ultra high-energy cosmic rays. Recently, observations have revealed that GRBs generally originate from metal-poor, low-luminosity galaxies and do not directly trace cosmic star formation, as might have been assumed from their association with core-collapse supernovae. Several implications follow from these findings. The redshift distribution of observed GRBs is expected to peak at higher redshift (compared to cosmic star formation), which is supported by the mean redshift of the Swift GRB sample, <z>{approx}3. If GRBs are, in fact, the source of the observed UHECR, then cosmic-ray production would evolve with redshift in a stronger fashion than has been previously suggested. This necessarily leads, through the GZK process, to an enhancement in the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos, providing a near-term approach for testing the gamma-ray burst-cosmic-ray connection with ongoing and proposed UHE neutrino experiments.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21020338
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.083004; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; COSMIC PHOTONS; COSMOLOGY; DISTRIBUTION; GALAXIES; NEUTRINOS; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Yueksel, Hasan, Kistler, Matthew D., and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Enhanced cosmological GRB rates and implications for cosmogenic neutrinos. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.083004.
Yueksel, Hasan, Kistler, Matthew D., & Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Enhanced cosmological GRB rates and implications for cosmogenic neutrinos. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.083004.
Yueksel, Hasan, Kistler, Matthew D., and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Sun . "Enhanced cosmological GRB rates and implications for cosmogenic neutrinos". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.083004.
@article{osti_21020338,
title = {Enhanced cosmological GRB rates and implications for cosmogenic neutrinos},
author = {Yueksel, Hasan and Kistler, Matthew D. and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210},
abstractNote = {Gamma-ray bursts, which are among the most violent events in the Universe, are one of the few viable candidates to produce ultra high-energy cosmic rays. Recently, observations have revealed that GRBs generally originate from metal-poor, low-luminosity galaxies and do not directly trace cosmic star formation, as might have been assumed from their association with core-collapse supernovae. Several implications follow from these findings. The redshift distribution of observed GRBs is expected to peak at higher redshift (compared to cosmic star formation), which is supported by the mean redshift of the Swift GRB sample, <z>{approx}3. If GRBs are, in fact, the source of the observed UHECR, then cosmic-ray production would evolve with redshift in a stronger fashion than has been previously suggested. This necessarily leads, through the GZK process, to an enhancement in the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos, providing a near-term approach for testing the gamma-ray burst-cosmic-ray connection with ongoing and proposed UHE neutrino experiments.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.083004},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 8,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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