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Title: Dissecting the Cygnus region with TeV gamma rays and neutrinos

Abstract

Recent Milagro observations of the Cygnus region have revealed both diffuse TeV gamma-ray emission and a bright and extended TeV source, MGRO J2019+37, which seems to lack an obvious counterpart at other wavelengths. Additional study of this curious object also promises to provide important clues concerning one of the Milky Way's most active environments. We point out some of the principal facts involved by following three modes of attack. First, to gain insight into this mysterious source, we consider its relation to known objects in both the Cygnus region and the rest of the Galaxy. Second, we find that a simple hadronic model can easily accommodate Milagro's flux measurement (which is at a single energy), as well as other existing observations spanning nearly 7 orders of magnitude in gamma-ray energy. Third, since a hadronic gamma-ray spectrum necessitates an accompanying TeV neutrino flux, we show that IceCube observations may provide the first direct evidence of a Galactic cosmic-ray accelerator.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21020335
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.083001; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COSMIC NEUTRINOS; COSMIC PHOTONS; COSMIC RAY DETECTION; COSMOLOGY; GAIN; GAMMA SPECTRA; HADRONS; MILKY WAY; NEUTRINOS; PHOTON EMISSION; TEV RANGE; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Beacom, John F., Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, Kistler, Matthew D., and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Dissecting the Cygnus region with TeV gamma rays and neutrinos. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.083001.
Beacom, John F., Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, Kistler, Matthew D., & Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Dissecting the Cygnus region with TeV gamma rays and neutrinos. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.083001.
Beacom, John F., Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, Kistler, Matthew D., and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Sun . "Dissecting the Cygnus region with TeV gamma rays and neutrinos". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.083001.
@article{osti_21020335,
title = {Dissecting the Cygnus region with TeV gamma rays and neutrinos},
author = {Beacom, John F. and Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 and Kistler, Matthew D. and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210},
abstractNote = {Recent Milagro observations of the Cygnus region have revealed both diffuse TeV gamma-ray emission and a bright and extended TeV source, MGRO J2019+37, which seems to lack an obvious counterpart at other wavelengths. Additional study of this curious object also promises to provide important clues concerning one of the Milky Way's most active environments. We point out some of the principal facts involved by following three modes of attack. First, to gain insight into this mysterious source, we consider its relation to known objects in both the Cygnus region and the rest of the Galaxy. Second, we find that a simple hadronic model can easily accommodate Milagro's flux measurement (which is at a single energy), as well as other existing observations spanning nearly 7 orders of magnitude in gamma-ray energy. Third, since a hadronic gamma-ray spectrum necessitates an accompanying TeV neutrino flux, we show that IceCube observations may provide the first direct evidence of a Galactic cosmic-ray accelerator.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.083001},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 8,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}