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Title: Gravitational waves from extreme mass ratio inspirals in nonpure Kerr spacetimes

Abstract

To investigate the imprint on the gravitational-wave emission from extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) in nonpure Kerr spacetimes, we have studied the kludge waveforms generated in highly accurate, numerically generated spacetimes containing a black hole and a self-gravitating, homogeneous torus with comparable mass and spin. In order to maximize their impact on the produced waveforms, we have considered tori that are compact, massive, and close to the central black hole, investigating under what conditions the LISA experiment could detect their presence. Our results show that for a large portion of the space of parameters the waveforms produced by EMRIs in these black hole-torus systems are indistinguishable from pure Kerr waveforms. Hence, a 'confusion problem' will be present for observations carried out over a time scale below or comparable to the dephasing time.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. SISSA, International School for Advanced Studies and INFN, Trieste (Italy)
  2. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Potsdam-Golm (Germany)
  3. (United States)
  4. Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, University of Jena, Jena (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21020172
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.064026; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BLACK HOLES; COSMOLOGY; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; KERR METRIC; MASS; SPACE-TIME; SPIN; WAVE FORMS

Citation Formats

Barausse, Enrico, Rezzolla, Luciano, Department of Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Petroff, David, and Ansorg, Marcus. Gravitational waves from extreme mass ratio inspirals in nonpure Kerr spacetimes. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.064026.
Barausse, Enrico, Rezzolla, Luciano, Department of Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Petroff, David, & Ansorg, Marcus. Gravitational waves from extreme mass ratio inspirals in nonpure Kerr spacetimes. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.064026.
Barausse, Enrico, Rezzolla, Luciano, Department of Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Petroff, David, and Ansorg, Marcus. Thu . "Gravitational waves from extreme mass ratio inspirals in nonpure Kerr spacetimes". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.064026.
@article{osti_21020172,
title = {Gravitational waves from extreme mass ratio inspirals in nonpure Kerr spacetimes},
author = {Barausse, Enrico and Rezzolla, Luciano and Department of Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge and Petroff, David and Ansorg, Marcus},
abstractNote = {To investigate the imprint on the gravitational-wave emission from extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) in nonpure Kerr spacetimes, we have studied the kludge waveforms generated in highly accurate, numerically generated spacetimes containing a black hole and a self-gravitating, homogeneous torus with comparable mass and spin. In order to maximize their impact on the produced waveforms, we have considered tori that are compact, massive, and close to the central black hole, investigating under what conditions the LISA experiment could detect their presence. Our results show that for a large portion of the space of parameters the waveforms produced by EMRIs in these black hole-torus systems are indistinguishable from pure Kerr waveforms. Hence, a 'confusion problem' will be present for observations carried out over a time scale below or comparable to the dephasing time.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.064026},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 6,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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