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Title: Rotation of a magnetic field does not impact vacuum birefringence

Abstract

We study how the rotation of a classical magnetic field influences vacuum birefringence. In spite of the fact that solutions of the wave equation depend in a nontrivial way on the relative magnitude of the strength of vacuum birefringence and the angular rotation frequency of the magnetic field, the induced ellipticity of the light ray does not depend on the magnetic field angular rotation frequency. Hence, in contrast to recent claims, the result of the PVLAS experiment cannot be explained by conventional nonlinear quantum electrodynamic000.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2505 Correa Rd. Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21020043
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.053003; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BIREFRINGENCE; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; QUANTUM ELECTRODYNAMICS; VACUUM STATES; VISIBLE RADIATION; WAVE EQUATIONS

Citation Formats

Biswas, Sandip, and Melnikov, Kirill. Rotation of a magnetic field does not impact vacuum birefringence. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.053003.
Biswas, Sandip, & Melnikov, Kirill. Rotation of a magnetic field does not impact vacuum birefringence. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.053003.
Biswas, Sandip, and Melnikov, Kirill. Thu . "Rotation of a magnetic field does not impact vacuum birefringence". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.053003.
@article{osti_21020043,
title = {Rotation of a magnetic field does not impact vacuum birefringence},
author = {Biswas, Sandip and Melnikov, Kirill},
abstractNote = {We study how the rotation of a classical magnetic field influences vacuum birefringence. In spite of the fact that solutions of the wave equation depend in a nontrivial way on the relative magnitude of the strength of vacuum birefringence and the angular rotation frequency of the magnetic field, the induced ellipticity of the light ray does not depend on the magnetic field angular rotation frequency. Hence, in contrast to recent claims, the result of the PVLAS experiment cannot be explained by conventional nonlinear quantum electrodynamic000.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.053003},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 5,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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