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Title: Integrated measures of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes Basin

Abstract

Using publicly available, pre-existing spatial datasets, we developed a geographic information system database of 86 variables related to five classes of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes basin: agriculture, atmospheric deposition, human population, land cover, and point source pollution. The original variables were quantified by a variety of data types over a broad range of spatial and classification resolutions. We summarized the original data for 762 watershed-based units that comprise the U.S. portion of the basin and then used principal components analysis to develop overall stress measures within each stress category. We developed a cumulative stress index by combining the first principal component from each of the five stress categories. Maps of the stress measures illustrate strong spatial patterns across the basin, with the greatest amount of stress occurring on the western shore of Lake Michigan, southwest Lake Erie, and southeastern Lake Ontario. We found strong relationships between the stress measures and characteristics of bird communities, fish communities, and water chemistry measurements from the coastal region. The stress measures are taken to represent the major threats to coastal ecosystems in the U.S. Great Lakes. Such regional-scale efforts are critical for understanding relationships between human disturbance and ecosystem response, andmore » can be used to guide environmental decision-making at both regional and local scales.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (and others) [University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21017246
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Management; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: ndanz@nrri.umn.edu
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; USA; GREAT LAKES; WATER POLLUTION; FISHES; COASTAL REGIONS; ECOSYSTEMS; DATA ANALYSIS; POLLUTION SOURCES; AGRICULTURE; DEPOSITION; LAND USE; POINT POLLUTANT SOURCES; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; WATERSHEDS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; BIRDS; WATER CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Danz, Nicholas, Niemi, Gerald, and Regal, Ronald. Integrated measures of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes Basin. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s00267-005-0293-0.
Danz, Nicholas, Niemi, Gerald, & Regal, Ronald. Integrated measures of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes Basin. United States. doi:10.1007/s00267-005-0293-0.
Danz, Nicholas, Niemi, Gerald, and Regal, Ronald. Tue . "Integrated measures of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes Basin". United States. doi:10.1007/s00267-005-0293-0.
@article{osti_21017246,
title = {Integrated measures of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes Basin},
author = {Danz, Nicholas and Niemi, Gerald and Regal, Ronald},
abstractNote = {Using publicly available, pre-existing spatial datasets, we developed a geographic information system database of 86 variables related to five classes of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes basin: agriculture, atmospheric deposition, human population, land cover, and point source pollution. The original variables were quantified by a variety of data types over a broad range of spatial and classification resolutions. We summarized the original data for 762 watershed-based units that comprise the U.S. portion of the basin and then used principal components analysis to develop overall stress measures within each stress category. We developed a cumulative stress index by combining the first principal component from each of the five stress categories. Maps of the stress measures illustrate strong spatial patterns across the basin, with the greatest amount of stress occurring on the western shore of Lake Michigan, southwest Lake Erie, and southeastern Lake Ontario. We found strong relationships between the stress measures and characteristics of bird communities, fish communities, and water chemistry measurements from the coastal region. The stress measures are taken to represent the major threats to coastal ecosystems in the U.S. Great Lakes. Such regional-scale efforts are critical for understanding relationships between human disturbance and ecosystem response, and can be used to guide environmental decision-making at both regional and local scales.},
doi = {10.1007/s00267-005-0293-0},
journal = {Environmental Management},
number = 5,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}