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Title: Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size

Abstract

The preparation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that have a moderate pore size is reported. This preparation method involves a hydrothermal process that produces a precursor mixture and a following acid treatment of the precursor to get the porous material. The majority of the particles have a pore size close to 20nm, which complements and fills in the gap between the existing cadmium sulfide materials, which usually have a pore size either less than 10nm or are well above 100nm.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5]
  1. Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, WA 6102 (Australia)
  2. (Australia), E-mail: zhaohui.han@curtin.edu.au
  3. Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)
  4. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)
  5. ARC Centre for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21015727
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 180; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.jssc.2006.12.017; PII: S0022-4596(06)00652-9; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CADMIUM SULFIDES; NANOSTRUCTURES; PARTICLES; POROUS MATERIALS; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Han Zhaohui, Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Zhu, Huaiyong, Shi, Jeffrey, Parkinson, Gordon, and Lu, G.Q. Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Han Zhaohui, Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Zhu, Huaiyong, Shi, Jeffrey, Parkinson, Gordon, & Lu, G.Q. Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size. United States.
Han Zhaohui, Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Zhu, Huaiyong, Shi, Jeffrey, Parkinson, Gordon, and Lu, G.Q. Thu . "Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21015727,
title = {Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size},
author = {Han Zhaohui and Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 and Zhu, Huaiyong and Shi, Jeffrey and Parkinson, Gordon and Lu, G.Q.},
abstractNote = {The preparation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that have a moderate pore size is reported. This preparation method involves a hydrothermal process that produces a precursor mixture and a following acid treatment of the precursor to get the porous material. The majority of the particles have a pore size close to 20nm, which complements and fills in the gap between the existing cadmium sulfide materials, which usually have a pore size either less than 10nm or are well above 100nm.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Solid State Chemistry},
number = 3,
volume = 180,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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