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Title: Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid

Abstract

The ability of malic acid to control calcium carbonate morphology has been investigated by aging calcium chloride solution in the presence of urea in a 90 deg. C bath. Malic acid favors the formation of calcite. A transition from single block to aggregate with special morphology occurs upon increasing malic acid concentration. The morphological development of CaCO{sub 3} crystal obviously depends on the starting pH. CaCO{sub 3} crystal grows from spindle seed to dumbbell in the pH regime from 7 to 11; while it evolves from spindle seed, through peanut, to sphere at pH=11.5. Both dumbbell and sphere consist of rods that are elongated along c-axis and capped with three smooth, well-defined rhombic {l_brace}1 0 4{r_brace} faces. A tentative growth mechanism is proposed based on the fractal model suggested by R. Kniep and S. Busch [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 35 (1996) 2624]. - Graphical abstract: Dumbbell-like CaCO{sub 3} particles obtained in the presence of malic acid.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)
  2. Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China), E-mail: jhhuang@zstu.edu.cn
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21015670
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 180; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.jssc.2006.11.002; PII: S0022-4596(06)00587-1; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CALCITE; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CALCIUM CHLORIDES; CRYSTALS; MALIC ACID; MORPHOLOGY; PH VALUE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; UREA

Citation Formats

Mao Zhaofeng, and Huang Jianhua. Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Mao Zhaofeng, & Huang Jianhua. Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid. United States.
Mao Zhaofeng, and Huang Jianhua. Thu . "Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21015670,
title = {Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid},
author = {Mao Zhaofeng and Huang Jianhua},
abstractNote = {The ability of malic acid to control calcium carbonate morphology has been investigated by aging calcium chloride solution in the presence of urea in a 90 deg. C bath. Malic acid favors the formation of calcite. A transition from single block to aggregate with special morphology occurs upon increasing malic acid concentration. The morphological development of CaCO{sub 3} crystal obviously depends on the starting pH. CaCO{sub 3} crystal grows from spindle seed to dumbbell in the pH regime from 7 to 11; while it evolves from spindle seed, through peanut, to sphere at pH=11.5. Both dumbbell and sphere consist of rods that are elongated along c-axis and capped with three smooth, well-defined rhombic {l_brace}1 0 4{r_brace} faces. A tentative growth mechanism is proposed based on the fractal model suggested by R. Kniep and S. Busch [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 35 (1996) 2624]. - Graphical abstract: Dumbbell-like CaCO{sub 3} particles obtained in the presence of malic acid.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Solid State Chemistry},
number = 2,
volume = 180,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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