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Title: Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres formed through a self-templating solid-gas interface reaction

Abstract

Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by simply heating aluminum nanoparticles in ammonia at 1000 deg. C. The as-synthesized sphere shells are polycrystalline with cavity diameters ranging from 15 to 100 nm and shell thickness from 5 to 15 nm. The formation mechanism can be explained by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect, which results from the difference in diffusion rates between aluminum and nitrogen. The Al nanoparticles served as both reactant and templates for the hollow sphere formation. The effects of precursor particle size and temperature were also investigated in terms of product morphology. Room temperature cathode luminescence spectrum of the nanosized hollow spheres showed a broad emission band centered at 415 nm, which is originated from oxygen related luminescence centers. The hollow structure survived a 4-h heat treatment at 1200 deg. C, exhibiting excellent thermal stability. - Graphical abstract: Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by nitridation of aluminum nanoparticles at 1000 deg. C using ammonia.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China), E-mail: xgli@pku.edu.cn
  2. State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)
  3. (China)
  4. Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21015647
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 180; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.jssc.2006.10.011; PII: S0022-4596(06)00554-8; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ALUMINIUM NITRIDES; AMMONIA; HEAT TREATMENTS; KIRKENDALL EFFECT; LUMINESCENCE; NANOSTRUCTURES; NITRIDATION; NITROGEN; PARTICLE SIZE; PARTICLES; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000-4000 K

Citation Formats

Zheng Jie, Song Xubo, Zhang Yaohua, Li Yan, Li Xingguo, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, and Pu Yikang. Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres formed through a self-templating solid-gas interface reaction. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2006.10.011.
Zheng Jie, Song Xubo, Zhang Yaohua, Li Yan, Li Xingguo, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, & Pu Yikang. Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres formed through a self-templating solid-gas interface reaction. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2006.10.011.
Zheng Jie, Song Xubo, Zhang Yaohua, Li Yan, Li Xingguo, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, and Pu Yikang. Mon . "Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres formed through a self-templating solid-gas interface reaction". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2006.10.011.
@article{osti_21015647,
title = {Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres formed through a self-templating solid-gas interface reaction},
author = {Zheng Jie and Song Xubo and Zhang Yaohua and Li Yan and Li Xingguo and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 and Pu Yikang},
abstractNote = {Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by simply heating aluminum nanoparticles in ammonia at 1000 deg. C. The as-synthesized sphere shells are polycrystalline with cavity diameters ranging from 15 to 100 nm and shell thickness from 5 to 15 nm. The formation mechanism can be explained by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect, which results from the difference in diffusion rates between aluminum and nitrogen. The Al nanoparticles served as both reactant and templates for the hollow sphere formation. The effects of precursor particle size and temperature were also investigated in terms of product morphology. Room temperature cathode luminescence spectrum of the nanosized hollow spheres showed a broad emission band centered at 415 nm, which is originated from oxygen related luminescence centers. The hollow structure survived a 4-h heat treatment at 1200 deg. C, exhibiting excellent thermal stability. - Graphical abstract: Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by nitridation of aluminum nanoparticles at 1000 deg. C using ammonia.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jssc.2006.10.011},
journal = {Journal of Solid State Chemistry},
number = 1,
volume = 180,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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