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Title: Averaging in spherically symmetric cosmology

Abstract

The averaging problem in cosmology is of fundamental importance. When applied to study cosmological evolution, the theory of macroscopic gravity (MG) can be regarded as a long-distance modification of general relativity. In the MG approach to the averaging problem in cosmology, the Einstein field equations on cosmological scales are modified by appropriate gravitational correlation terms. We study the averaging problem within the class of spherically symmetric cosmological models. That is, we shall take the microscopic equations and effect the averaging procedure to determine the precise form of the correlation tensor in this case. In particular, by working in volume-preserving coordinates, we calculate the form of the correlation tensor under some reasonable assumptions on the form for the inhomogeneous gravitational field and matter distribution. We find that the correlation tensor in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background must be of the form of a spatial curvature. Inhomogeneities and spatial averaging, through this spatial curvature correction term, can have a very significant dynamical effect on the dynamics of the Universe and cosmological observations; in particular, we discuss whether spatial averaging might lead to a more conservative explanation of the observed acceleration of the Universe (without the introduction of exotic dark matter fields). We alsomore » find that the correlation tensor for a non-FLRW background can be interpreted as the sum of a spatial curvature and an anisotropic fluid. This may lead to interesting effects of averaging on astrophysical scales. We also discuss the results of averaging an inhomogeneous Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi solution as well as calculations of linear perturbations (that is, the backreaction) in an FLRW background, which support the main conclusions of the analysis.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21011049
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.043506; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACCELERATION; ANISOTROPY; CORRECTIONS; CORRELATIONS; COSMOLOGICAL MODELS; COSMOLOGY; DISTURBANCES; EINSTEIN FIELD EQUATIONS; GENERAL RELATIVITY THEORY; GRAVITATION; GRAVITATIONAL FIELDS; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; TENSORS; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Coley, A. A., and Pelavas, N.. Averaging in spherically symmetric cosmology. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.043506.
Coley, A. A., & Pelavas, N.. Averaging in spherically symmetric cosmology. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.043506.
Coley, A. A., and Pelavas, N.. Thu . "Averaging in spherically symmetric cosmology". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.043506.
@article{osti_21011049,
title = {Averaging in spherically symmetric cosmology},
author = {Coley, A. A. and Pelavas, N.},
abstractNote = {The averaging problem in cosmology is of fundamental importance. When applied to study cosmological evolution, the theory of macroscopic gravity (MG) can be regarded as a long-distance modification of general relativity. In the MG approach to the averaging problem in cosmology, the Einstein field equations on cosmological scales are modified by appropriate gravitational correlation terms. We study the averaging problem within the class of spherically symmetric cosmological models. That is, we shall take the microscopic equations and effect the averaging procedure to determine the precise form of the correlation tensor in this case. In particular, by working in volume-preserving coordinates, we calculate the form of the correlation tensor under some reasonable assumptions on the form for the inhomogeneous gravitational field and matter distribution. We find that the correlation tensor in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background must be of the form of a spatial curvature. Inhomogeneities and spatial averaging, through this spatial curvature correction term, can have a very significant dynamical effect on the dynamics of the Universe and cosmological observations; in particular, we discuss whether spatial averaging might lead to a more conservative explanation of the observed acceleration of the Universe (without the introduction of exotic dark matter fields). We also find that the correlation tensor for a non-FLRW background can be interpreted as the sum of a spatial curvature and an anisotropic fluid. This may lead to interesting effects of averaging on astrophysical scales. We also discuss the results of averaging an inhomogeneous Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi solution as well as calculations of linear perturbations (that is, the backreaction) in an FLRW background, which support the main conclusions of the analysis.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.043506},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 4,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • We discuss the averaging problem in general relativity, using the form of the macroscopic gravity equations in the case of spherical symmetry in volume preserving coordinates. In particular, we calculate the form of the correlation tensor under some reasonable assumptions on the form for the inhomogeneous gravitational field and matter distribution. On cosmological scales, the correlation tensor in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background is found to be of the form of a spatial curvature. On astrophysical scales the correlation tensor can be interpreted as the sum of a spatial curvature and an anisotropic fluid. We briefly discuss the physical implications ofmore » these results.« less
  • We consider scalar-tensor theories in D-dimensional spacetime, D{>=}4. They consist of a metric and a nonminimally coupled scalar field, with its nonminimal coupling characterized by a function. The probes couple minimally to the metric only. We obtain vacuum solutions--both cosmological and static spherically symmetric ones--and study their properties. We find that, as seen by the probes, there is no singularity in the cosmological solutions for a class of functions which obey certain constraints. It turns out that for the same class of functions, there are static spherically symmetric solutions which exhibit novel properties: e.g., near the 'horizon', the gravitational forcemore » as seen by the probe becomes repulsive.« less
  • One of the continuing challenges in cosmology has been to determine the large-scale space-time metric from observations with a minimum of assumptions — without, for instance, assuming that the universe is almost Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW). If we are lucky enough this would be a way of demonstrating that our universe is FLRW, instead of presupposing it or simply showing that the observations are consistent with FLRW. Showing how to do this within the more general spherically symmetric, inhomogeneous space-time framework takes us a long way towards fulfilling this goal. In recent work researchers have shown how this can be done bothmore » in the traditional Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) 3 + 1 coordinate framework, and in the observational coordinate (OC) framework, in which the radial coordinate y is null (light-like) and measured down the past light cone of the observer. In this paper we investigate the stability of solutions, and the use of data in the OC field equations including their time evolution — i.e. our procedure is not restricted to our past light cone — and compare both approaches with respect to the singularity problem at the maximum of the angular-diameter distance, the stability of solutions, and the use of data in the field equations. We also compare the two approaches with regard to determining the cosmological constant Λ. This allows a more detailed account and assessment of the OC integration procedure, and enables a comparison of the relative advantages of the two equivalent solution frameworks. Both formulations and integration procedures should, in principle, lead to the same results. However, as we show in this paper, the OC procedure manifests certain advantages, particularly in the avoidance of coordinate singularities at the maximum of the angular-diameter distance, and in the stability of the solutions obtained. This particular feature is what allows us to do the best fitting of the data to smooth data functions and the possibility of constructing analytic solutions to the field equations. Smoothed data functions enable us to include properties that data must have within the model.« less
  • We present a general gauge invariant formalism for defining cosmological averages that are relevant for observations based on light-like signals. Such averages involve either null hypersurfaces corresponding to a family of past light-cones or compact surfaces given by their intersection with timelike hypersurfaces. Generalized Buchert-Ehlers commutation rules for derivatives of these light-cone averages are given. After introducing some adapted ''geodesic light-cone'' coordinates, we give explicit expressions for averaging the redshift to luminosity-distance relation and the so-called ''redshift drift'' in a generic inhomogeneous Universe.