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Title: Direct dark matter event rates with a velocity distribution in the Eddington approach

Abstract

Exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (associated with the cosmological constant) seem to dominate the Universe. Thus its direct detection is central to particle physics and cosmology. Supersymmetry provides a natural dark matter candidate, the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). One essential ingredient in obtaining the direct detection rates is the density and the velocity distribution of the LSP in our vicinity. In the present paper we study simultaneously density profiles and velocity distributions in the context of the Eddington approach. In such an approach, unlike the commonly assumed Maxwell-Boltzmann (M-B) distribution, the upper bound of the velocity arises naturally from the potential.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. University of Ioannina, Ioannina, GR 45110 (Greece)
  2. Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21011046
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.043503; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BOLTZMANN STATISTICS; COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT; COSMOLOGY; DENSITY; DISTRIBUTION; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION; POTENTIALS; SPARTICLES; SUPERSYMMETRY; UNIVERSE; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Vergados, J. D., and Owen, D. Direct dark matter event rates with a velocity distribution in the Eddington approach. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.043503.
Vergados, J. D., & Owen, D. Direct dark matter event rates with a velocity distribution in the Eddington approach. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.043503.
Vergados, J. D., and Owen, D. Thu . "Direct dark matter event rates with a velocity distribution in the Eddington approach". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.043503.
@article{osti_21011046,
title = {Direct dark matter event rates with a velocity distribution in the Eddington approach},
author = {Vergados, J. D. and Owen, D.},
abstractNote = {Exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (associated with the cosmological constant) seem to dominate the Universe. Thus its direct detection is central to particle physics and cosmology. Supersymmetry provides a natural dark matter candidate, the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). One essential ingredient in obtaining the direct detection rates is the density and the velocity distribution of the LSP in our vicinity. In the present paper we study simultaneously density profiles and velocity distributions in the context of the Eddington approach. In such an approach, unlike the commonly assumed Maxwell-Boltzmann (M-B) distribution, the upper bound of the velocity arises naturally from the potential.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.043503},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 4,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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