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Title: Direct detection of supersymmetric particles in neutrino telescopes

Abstract

In supersymmetric theories where the lightest supersymmetric particle is the gravitino the next to lightest supersymmetric particle is typically a long-lived charged slepton. In this paper, following our earlier proposal [I. Albuquerque, G. Burdman, and Z. Chacko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 221802 (2004).], we perform a detailed study of the production of pairs of these particles induced by the interactions of high energy cosmic neutrinos with nucleons in the Earth, their propagation through the Earth, and finally their detection in neutrino telescopes. We investigate the charged slepton energy loss in detail and establish that the relatively small cross section for the production of supersymmetric particles is partially compensated for by the very long range of these heavy particles. The signal, consisting of two parallel charged tracks emerging from the Earth, is characterized by a track separation of a few hundred meters. We perform a careful analysis of the main background, coming from direct di-muon production, and show that it can be separated from the signal due to its characteristically smaller track separation. We conclude that neutrino telescopes will complement collider searches in the determination of the supersymmetry breaking scale, and may even provide the first evidence for supersymmetry at themore » weak scale.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21011009
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.035006; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COSMIC NEUTRINOS; CROSS SECTIONS; ENERGY LOSSES; NEUTRINO REACTIONS; NUCLEONS; PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION; PARTICLE PRODUCTION; QUANTUM FIELD THEORY; SPARTICLES; SUPERSYMMETRY; SYMMETRY BREAKING; TELESCOPE COUNTERS

Citation Formats

Albuquerque, Ivone F. M., Burdman, Gustavo, Chacko, Z., and Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721. Direct detection of supersymmetric particles in neutrino telescopes. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.035006.
Albuquerque, Ivone F. M., Burdman, Gustavo, Chacko, Z., & Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721. Direct detection of supersymmetric particles in neutrino telescopes. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.035006.
Albuquerque, Ivone F. M., Burdman, Gustavo, Chacko, Z., and Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721. Thu . "Direct detection of supersymmetric particles in neutrino telescopes". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.035006.
@article{osti_21011009,
title = {Direct detection of supersymmetric particles in neutrino telescopes},
author = {Albuquerque, Ivone F. M. and Burdman, Gustavo and Chacko, Z. and Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721},
abstractNote = {In supersymmetric theories where the lightest supersymmetric particle is the gravitino the next to lightest supersymmetric particle is typically a long-lived charged slepton. In this paper, following our earlier proposal [I. Albuquerque, G. Burdman, and Z. Chacko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 221802 (2004).], we perform a detailed study of the production of pairs of these particles induced by the interactions of high energy cosmic neutrinos with nucleons in the Earth, their propagation through the Earth, and finally their detection in neutrino telescopes. We investigate the charged slepton energy loss in detail and establish that the relatively small cross section for the production of supersymmetric particles is partially compensated for by the very long range of these heavy particles. The signal, consisting of two parallel charged tracks emerging from the Earth, is characterized by a track separation of a few hundred meters. We perform a careful analysis of the main background, coming from direct di-muon production, and show that it can be separated from the signal due to its characteristically smaller track separation. We conclude that neutrino telescopes will complement collider searches in the determination of the supersymmetry breaking scale, and may even provide the first evidence for supersymmetry at the weak scale.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.75.035006},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 3,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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