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Title: The effect of clay content in sands used for cementitious materials in developing countries

Abstract

The cost of building materials in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs) is one of the single largest contributing factors to housing costs. They are often transported over relatively large distances at considerable expense. Local sands may contain significant amounts of clay, considered by local artisans to be detrimental to concrete strength; however, in an LEDC context, there is little evidence to support this. In this study, the compressive strength and workability of representative LEDC clay-contaminated concrete was determined. Clay-cement interactions were studied using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Different clays appeared to have fundamentally different effects on both workability and strength. No chemical interactions were detected. It was concluded that satisfactory concrete could be made from clay-contaminated sand.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)
  2. School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom). E-mail: pp@eng.warwick.ac.uk
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20995383
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cement and Concrete Research; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.016; PII: S0008-8846(07)00019-1; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CEMENTS; CLAYS; COMPRESSION STRENGTH; CONCRETES; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Fernandes, V.A., Purnell, P., Still, G.T., and Thomas, T.H. The effect of clay content in sands used for cementitious materials in developing countries. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.016.
Fernandes, V.A., Purnell, P., Still, G.T., & Thomas, T.H. The effect of clay content in sands used for cementitious materials in developing countries. United States. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.016.
Fernandes, V.A., Purnell, P., Still, G.T., and Thomas, T.H. Tue . "The effect of clay content in sands used for cementitious materials in developing countries". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.016.
@article{osti_20995383,
title = {The effect of clay content in sands used for cementitious materials in developing countries},
author = {Fernandes, V.A. and Purnell, P. and Still, G.T. and Thomas, T.H.},
abstractNote = {The cost of building materials in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs) is one of the single largest contributing factors to housing costs. They are often transported over relatively large distances at considerable expense. Local sands may contain significant amounts of clay, considered by local artisans to be detrimental to concrete strength; however, in an LEDC context, there is little evidence to support this. In this study, the compressive strength and workability of representative LEDC clay-contaminated concrete was determined. Clay-cement interactions were studied using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Different clays appeared to have fundamentally different effects on both workability and strength. No chemical interactions were detected. It was concluded that satisfactory concrete could be made from clay-contaminated sand.},
doi = {10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.016},
journal = {Cement and Concrete Research},
number = 5,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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