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Title: Toolbox for 3D imaging and modeling of porous media: Relationship with transport properties

Abstract

Porous media can be considered as interfacial systems where an internal surface partitions and fills the space in a complex way. Meaningful structural features appear on a length-scale where physical chemistry plays a central role either to impose a specific organisation on the material or to strongly modify the dynamics and the thermodynamics of the embedded fluids. A key issue is to understand how the geometrical and interfacial confinement affects numerous phenomena such as molecular diffusion, excitation relaxation, reaction kinetics, phase transitions, adsorption and capillary condensation. We will first review some experimental techniques able to image the 3D structure of disordered porous media. In the second part, we will analyse the geometrical and particularly some topological properties of a disordered porous material. We will discuss the interest and the limits of several strategies for obtaining 3D representations of various pore networks starting from an incomplete set of morphological characterisations. Finally, connection between geometry and diffusive transport will be presented, with emphasis on the application of pulsed gradient spin echo NMR technique as a tool for a multiscale analysis of transport in a confining geometry.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere condensee, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS, 91128, Palaiseau (France). E-mail: levitz@pmc.polytechnique.fr
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20995371
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cement and Concrete Research; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 3; Conference: International Conference on cementitious materials as model porous media: Nanostructure and transport processes, Centro Monte Verita (Switzerland), 17-22 Jul 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.08.004; PII: S0008-8846(06)00198-0; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; GEOMETRY; MORPHOLOGY; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY; POROUS MATERIALS; REACTION KINETICS; SIMULATION; SMALL ANGLE SCATTERING; SURFACES; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; THERMODYNAMICS; TOPOLOGY

Citation Formats

Levitz, P. Toolbox for 3D imaging and modeling of porous media: Relationship with transport properties. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.08.004.
Levitz, P. Toolbox for 3D imaging and modeling of porous media: Relationship with transport properties. United States. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.08.004.
Levitz, P. Thu . "Toolbox for 3D imaging and modeling of porous media: Relationship with transport properties". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.08.004.
@article{osti_20995371,
title = {Toolbox for 3D imaging and modeling of porous media: Relationship with transport properties},
author = {Levitz, P.},
abstractNote = {Porous media can be considered as interfacial systems where an internal surface partitions and fills the space in a complex way. Meaningful structural features appear on a length-scale where physical chemistry plays a central role either to impose a specific organisation on the material or to strongly modify the dynamics and the thermodynamics of the embedded fluids. A key issue is to understand how the geometrical and interfacial confinement affects numerous phenomena such as molecular diffusion, excitation relaxation, reaction kinetics, phase transitions, adsorption and capillary condensation. We will first review some experimental techniques able to image the 3D structure of disordered porous media. In the second part, we will analyse the geometrical and particularly some topological properties of a disordered porous material. We will discuss the interest and the limits of several strategies for obtaining 3D representations of various pore networks starting from an incomplete set of morphological characterisations. Finally, connection between geometry and diffusive transport will be presented, with emphasis on the application of pulsed gradient spin echo NMR technique as a tool for a multiscale analysis of transport in a confining geometry.},
doi = {10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.08.004},
journal = {Cement and Concrete Research},
number = 3,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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