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Title: Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs)

Abstract

This paper presents the engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs) with a compressive strength of 50 MPa. The study includes a determination of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, compressive strength, and the splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of IPCs, formulated using three different sources of Class-F fly ash. Six IPC mix designs were adopted to evaluate the effects of the inclusion of coarse aggregates and granulated blast furnace slag into the mixes. A total of 90 cylindrical and 24 small beam specimens were investigated, and all tests were carried out pursuant to the relevant Australian Standards. Although some variability between the mixes was observed, the results show that, in most cases, the engineering properties of IPCs compare favorably to those predicted by the relevant Australian Standards for concrete mixtures.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universityof Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)
  2. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Universityof Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, 3010 (Australia). E-mail: jannie@unimelb.edu.au
  3. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universityof Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia). E-mail: pamendis@unimelb.edu.au
  4. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Universityof Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, 3010 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20995364
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cement and Concrete Research; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.008; PII: S0008-8846(06)00251-1; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BLAST FURNACES; COMPRESSION STRENGTH; CONCRETES; ELASTICITY; FLEXURAL STRENGTH; FLY ASH; INORGANIC POLYMERS; PRESSURE RANGE MEGA PA 10-100; TENSILE PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Sofi, M., Deventer, J.S.J. van, Mendis, P.A., and Lukey, G.C. Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.008.
Sofi, M., Deventer, J.S.J. van, Mendis, P.A., & Lukey, G.C. Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs). United States. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.008.
Sofi, M., Deventer, J.S.J. van, Mendis, P.A., and Lukey, G.C. Thu . "Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs)". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.008.
@article{osti_20995364,
title = {Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs)},
author = {Sofi, M. and Deventer, J.S.J. van and Mendis, P.A. and Lukey, G.C.},
abstractNote = {This paper presents the engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs) with a compressive strength of 50 MPa. The study includes a determination of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, compressive strength, and the splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of IPCs, formulated using three different sources of Class-F fly ash. Six IPC mix designs were adopted to evaluate the effects of the inclusion of coarse aggregates and granulated blast furnace slag into the mixes. A total of 90 cylindrical and 24 small beam specimens were investigated, and all tests were carried out pursuant to the relevant Australian Standards. Although some variability between the mixes was observed, the results show that, in most cases, the engineering properties of IPCs compare favorably to those predicted by the relevant Australian Standards for concrete mixtures.},
doi = {10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.10.008},
journal = {Cement and Concrete Research},
number = 2,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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