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Title: Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth

Abstract

Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2. BST-2 is expressed not only on certain bone marrow stromal cell lines but also on various normal tissues, although its expression pattern is different from that of another bone marrow stromal cell surface molecule, BST-1. BST-2 surface expression on fibroblast cell lines facilitated the stromal cell-dependent growth of a murine bone marrow-derived pre-B-cell line, DW34. The results suggest that BST-2 may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita City (Japan) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
209935
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Genomics; Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: 10 Apr 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; GENES; DNA-CLONING; GENETIC MAPPING; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 19; BONE MARROW CELLS; GROWTH; DNA HYBRIDIZATION; FLUORESCENCE; NUCLEOTIDES; PROTEINS; AMINO ACIDS; RHEUMATIC DISEASES

Citation Formats

Ishikawa, Jun, Kaisho, Tsuneyasu, and Tomizawa, Hitoshi. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1016/0888-7543(95)80171-H.
Ishikawa, Jun, Kaisho, Tsuneyasu, & Tomizawa, Hitoshi. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. United States. doi:10.1016/0888-7543(95)80171-H.
Ishikawa, Jun, Kaisho, Tsuneyasu, and Tomizawa, Hitoshi. 1995. "Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth". United States. doi:10.1016/0888-7543(95)80171-H.
@article{osti_209935,
title = {Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth},
author = {Ishikawa, Jun and Kaisho, Tsuneyasu and Tomizawa, Hitoshi},
abstractNote = {Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2. BST-2 is expressed not only on certain bone marrow stromal cell lines but also on various normal tissues, although its expression pattern is different from that of another bone marrow stromal cell surface molecule, BST-1. BST-2 surface expression on fibroblast cell lines facilitated the stromal cell-dependent growth of a murine bone marrow-derived pre-B-cell line, DW34. The results suggest that BST-2 may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.},
doi = {10.1016/0888-7543(95)80171-H},
journal = {Genomics},
number = 3,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 4
}
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