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Title: Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) in rat liver regeneration

Abstract

We have applied serial analysis of gene expression for studying the molecular mechanism of the rat liver regeneration in the model of 70% partial hepatectomy. We generated three SAGE libraries from a normal control liver (NL library: 52,343 tags), from a sham control operated liver (Sham library: 51,028 tags), and from a regenerating liver (PH library: 53,061 tags). By SAGE bioinformatics analysis we identified 40 induced genes and 20 repressed genes during the liver regeneration. We verified temporal expression of such genes by real time PCR during the regeneration process and we characterized 13 induced genes and 3 repressed genes. We found connective tissue growth factor transcript and protein induced very early at 4 h after PH operation before hepatocytes proliferation is triggered. Our study suggests CTGF as a growth factor signaling mediator that could be involved directly in the mechanism of liver regeneration induction.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [2]
  1. Georg-August-University of Goettingen, Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, Robert Koch Str. 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany). E-mail: vcimica@aecom.yu.edu
  2. Georg-August-University of Goettingen, Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, Robert Koch Str. 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)
  3. Georg-August-University of Goettingen, Department of Developmental Biochemistry, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20991509
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 360; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.06.039; PII: S0006-291X(07)01280-6; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOLOGICAL REGENERATION; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; GENES; GROWTH FACTORS; HEPATECTOMY; LIVER; LIVER CELLS; PH VALUE; POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION; RATS

Citation Formats

Cimica, Velasco, Batusic, Danko, Haralanova-Ilieva, Borislava, Chen, Yonglong, Hollemann, Thomas, Pieler, Tomas, and Ramadori, Giuliano. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) in rat liver regeneration. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.06.039.
Cimica, Velasco, Batusic, Danko, Haralanova-Ilieva, Borislava, Chen, Yonglong, Hollemann, Thomas, Pieler, Tomas, & Ramadori, Giuliano. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) in rat liver regeneration. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.06.039.
Cimica, Velasco, Batusic, Danko, Haralanova-Ilieva, Borislava, Chen, Yonglong, Hollemann, Thomas, Pieler, Tomas, and Ramadori, Giuliano. 2007. "Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) in rat liver regeneration". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.06.039.
@article{osti_20991509,
title = {Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) in rat liver regeneration},
author = {Cimica, Velasco and Batusic, Danko and Haralanova-Ilieva, Borislava and Chen, Yonglong and Hollemann, Thomas and Pieler, Tomas and Ramadori, Giuliano},
abstractNote = {We have applied serial analysis of gene expression for studying the molecular mechanism of the rat liver regeneration in the model of 70% partial hepatectomy. We generated three SAGE libraries from a normal control liver (NL library: 52,343 tags), from a sham control operated liver (Sham library: 51,028 tags), and from a regenerating liver (PH library: 53,061 tags). By SAGE bioinformatics analysis we identified 40 induced genes and 20 repressed genes during the liver regeneration. We verified temporal expression of such genes by real time PCR during the regeneration process and we characterized 13 induced genes and 3 repressed genes. We found connective tissue growth factor transcript and protein induced very early at 4 h after PH operation before hepatocytes proliferation is triggered. Our study suggests CTGF as a growth factor signaling mediator that could be involved directly in the mechanism of liver regeneration induction.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.06.039},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 3,
volume = 360,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 8
}
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