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Title: Molecular characterization of a novel RhoGAP, RRC-1 of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

Abstract

The GTPase-activating proteins for Rho family GTPases (RhoGAP) transduce diverse intracellular signals by negatively regulating Rho family GTPase-mediated pathways. In this study, we have cloned and characterized a novel RhoGAP for Rac1 and Cdc42, termed RRC-1, from Caenorhabditis elegans. RRC-1 was highly homologous to mammalian p250GAP and promoted GTP hydrolysis of Rac1 and Cdc42 in cells. The rrc-1 mRNA was expressed in all life stages. Using an RRC-1::GFP fusion protein, we found that RRC-1 was localized to the coelomocytes, excretory cell, GLR cells, and uterine-seam cell in adult worms. These data contribute toward understanding the roles of Rho family GTPases in C. elegans.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4]
  1. Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)
  2. Division of Biochemistry, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan)
  3. Molecular Genetics Research Laboratory, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo (Japan)
  4. Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan). E-mail: tyamamot@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20991364
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 357; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.192; PII: S0006-291X(07)00623-7; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; HYDROLYSIS; MOLECULAR BIOLOGY; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; NEMATODES; PROTEINS

Citation Formats

Delawary, Mina, Nakazawa, Takanobu, Tezuka, Tohru, Sawa, Mariko, Iino, Yuichi, Takenawa, Tadaomi, and Yamamoto, Tadashi. Molecular characterization of a novel RhoGAP, RRC-1 of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.192.
Delawary, Mina, Nakazawa, Takanobu, Tezuka, Tohru, Sawa, Mariko, Iino, Yuichi, Takenawa, Tadaomi, & Yamamoto, Tadashi. Molecular characterization of a novel RhoGAP, RRC-1 of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.192.
Delawary, Mina, Nakazawa, Takanobu, Tezuka, Tohru, Sawa, Mariko, Iino, Yuichi, Takenawa, Tadaomi, and Yamamoto, Tadashi. Fri . "Molecular characterization of a novel RhoGAP, RRC-1 of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.192.
@article{osti_20991364,
title = {Molecular characterization of a novel RhoGAP, RRC-1 of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans},
author = {Delawary, Mina and Nakazawa, Takanobu and Tezuka, Tohru and Sawa, Mariko and Iino, Yuichi and Takenawa, Tadaomi and Yamamoto, Tadashi},
abstractNote = {The GTPase-activating proteins for Rho family GTPases (RhoGAP) transduce diverse intracellular signals by negatively regulating Rho family GTPase-mediated pathways. In this study, we have cloned and characterized a novel RhoGAP for Rac1 and Cdc42, termed RRC-1, from Caenorhabditis elegans. RRC-1 was highly homologous to mammalian p250GAP and promoted GTP hydrolysis of Rac1 and Cdc42 in cells. The rrc-1 mRNA was expressed in all life stages. Using an RRC-1::GFP fusion protein, we found that RRC-1 was localized to the coelomocytes, excretory cell, GLR cells, and uterine-seam cell in adult worms. These data contribute toward understanding the roles of Rho family GTPases in C. elegans.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.192},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 357,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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