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Title: Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways

Abstract

Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Department of Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)
  3. School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of). E-mail: yk-kim@korea.ac.kr
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20991346
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 356; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.070; PII: S0006-291X(07)00562-1; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AMP; CELL PROLIFERATION; GENE REGULATION; HEPATITIS; HEPATOMAS; LIVER CIRRHOSIS; LUCIFERASE; REPLICONS; VIRUSES

Citation Formats

Kim, Kyoung Mi, Kwon, Shi-Nae, Kang, Ju-Il, Lee, Song Hee, Jang, Sung Key, Ahn, Byung-Yoon, and Kim, Yoon Ki. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.070.
Kim, Kyoung Mi, Kwon, Shi-Nae, Kang, Ju-Il, Lee, Song Hee, Jang, Sung Key, Ahn, Byung-Yoon, & Kim, Yoon Ki. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.070.
Kim, Kyoung Mi, Kwon, Shi-Nae, Kang, Ju-Il, Lee, Song Hee, Jang, Sung Key, Ahn, Byung-Yoon, and Kim, Yoon Ki. Fri . "Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.070.
@article{osti_20991346,
title = {Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways},
author = {Kim, Kyoung Mi and Kwon, Shi-Nae and Kang, Ju-Il and Lee, Song Hee and Jang, Sung Key and Ahn, Byung-Yoon and Kim, Yoon Ki},
abstractNote = {Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.070},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 356,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 18 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri May 18 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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