skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Truncated pStat5B is associated with the Idd4 locus in NOD mice

Abstract

We investigate JAK-STAT5 activation and its relationship to full-length Stat5B (FL-Stat5) and constitutive phosphorylated carboxy-truncated Stat5B (ct-pStat5) in four different strains of mouse. Our electrophoresis mobility shift assays data indicate constitutive phosphorylation of full-length-Stat5 (p < 0.001) and DNA binding in NOD but not in B6 mice. Our data suggest that the relative ratio of FL-Stat5: ct-Stat5 in NOD is 5- to 8-fold lower (p < 0.0001) when compared with normal B6 mice. Additionally, EMSAs data from B6.NOD/c11 suggest contribution of Idd4 susceptibility locus on chromosome 11 in constitutive phosphorylation of Stat5 in NOD mice. The presence of ct-pStat5 in regulatory T cells of NOD mice suggests this form of Stat5 is associated with impaired function of Tregs in NOD mouse. In agreement with our previous report the JAK-Stat5B defective pathway in NOD mice along with other defective factors is associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). E-mail: semiromi@pathology.ufl.edu
  2. Departments of Microbiology and Internal Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA (United States)
  3. Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20991335
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 356; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.028; PII: S0006-291X(07)00488-3; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CHROMOSOMES; DIABETES MELLITUS; DNA; ELECTROPHORESIS; MICE; NITRIC OXIDE; PATHOGENESIS; PHOSPHORYLATION

Citation Formats

Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza, McDuffie, Marcia, Litherland, Sally, and Clare-Salzler, Michael. Truncated pStat5B is associated with the Idd4 locus in NOD mice. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.028.
Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza, McDuffie, Marcia, Litherland, Sally, & Clare-Salzler, Michael. Truncated pStat5B is associated with the Idd4 locus in NOD mice. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.028.
Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza, McDuffie, Marcia, Litherland, Sally, and Clare-Salzler, Michael. Fri . "Truncated pStat5B is associated with the Idd4 locus in NOD mice". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.028.
@article{osti_20991335,
title = {Truncated pStat5B is associated with the Idd4 locus in NOD mice},
author = {Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza and McDuffie, Marcia and Litherland, Sally and Clare-Salzler, Michael},
abstractNote = {We investigate JAK-STAT5 activation and its relationship to full-length Stat5B (FL-Stat5) and constitutive phosphorylated carboxy-truncated Stat5B (ct-pStat5) in four different strains of mouse. Our electrophoresis mobility shift assays data indicate constitutive phosphorylation of full-length-Stat5 (p < 0.001) and DNA binding in NOD but not in B6 mice. Our data suggest that the relative ratio of FL-Stat5: ct-Stat5 in NOD is 5- to 8-fold lower (p < 0.0001) when compared with normal B6 mice. Additionally, EMSAs data from B6.NOD/c11 suggest contribution of Idd4 susceptibility locus on chromosome 11 in constitutive phosphorylation of Stat5 in NOD mice. The presence of ct-pStat5 in regulatory T cells of NOD mice suggests this form of Stat5 is associated with impaired function of Tregs in NOD mouse. In agreement with our previous report the JAK-Stat5B defective pathway in NOD mice along with other defective factors is associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.03.028},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 3,
volume = 356,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The development of autoimmune diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is controlled by at least three recessive loci, including one linked to the MHC. To determine whether any of these genetic loci exert their effects via the immune system, radiation bone marrow chimeras were constructed in which (NOD X B10)F1-irradiated recipients were reconstituted with NOD bone marrow cells. Unmanipulated (NOD X B10)F1 mice, or irradiated F1 mice reconstituted with F1 or B10 bone marrow, did not display insulitis or diabetes. In contrast, insulitis was observed in a majority of the NOD----F1 chimeras and diabetes developed in 21% of themore » mice. These data demonstrate that expression of the diabetic phenotype in the NOD mouse is dependent on NOD-derived hematopoietic stem cells. Diabetogenic genes in the NOD mouse do not appear to function at the level of the insulin-producing beta cells since NOD----F1 chimeras not only developed insulitis and diabetes but also rejected beta cells within pancreas transplants from newborn B10 mice. These data suggest that the beta cells of the NOD mouse do not express a unique antigenic determinant that is the target of the autoimmune response.« less
  • Common, familial human disorders generally do not follow Mendelian inheritance patterns, presumably because multiple loci are involved in disease susceptibility. One approach to mapping genes for such traits in humans is to first study an analogous form in an animal model, such as mouse, by using inbred strains and backcross experiments. Here the authors describe methodology for analyzing multiple-locus linkage data from such experimental backcrosses, particularly in light of multilocus genetic models, including the effects of epistasis. They illustrate these methods by using data from backcrosses involving nonobese diabetic mouse, which serves as an animal model for human insulin-dependent diabetesmore » mellitus. They show that it is likely that a minimum of nine loci contribute to susceptibility, with strong epistasis effects among these loci. Three of the loci actually confer a protective effect in the homozygote, compared with the heterozygote. Further, they discuss the relevance of these studies for analogous studies of the human form of the trait. Specifically, they show that the magnitude of the gene effect in the experimental backcross is likely to correlate only weakly, at best, with the expected magnitude of effect for a human form, because in humans the gene effect will depend more heavily on disease allele frequencies than on the observed penetrance ratios; such allele frequencies are unpredictable. Hence, the major benefit from animal studies may be a better understanding of the disease process itself, rather than identification of cells through comparison mapping in humans by using regions of homology. 12 refs., 7 tabs.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Predisposition to Type I insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD) has a strong underlying genetic basis involving class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes as well as several non-MHC genetic systems. In the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a model for human IDD, genes associated with the appearance of immune cell infiltrates in the pancreatic islets (insulitis) and/or overt IDD have been mapped to chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 11, and 17. A recent report has suggested that CD8+ lymphocytes of the NOD mouse might be deficient in the expression of the CD8{Beta} molecule, a protein encoded by a gene on chromosome 6. The CD8{Beta}more » molecule is a T-cell surface marker, the lack of which could affect selection in the thymus, possibly permitting auto-reactive T-cell clones to populate the peripheral lymphoid tissues. For this reason, we examined the expression of the CD8 molecule by lymphocytes in the NOD mouse. Results indicate that the NOD mouse is not deficient in its transcription of detectable mRNA encoding either the CD8{alpha} or {Beta} subunits. However, the NOD mouse expresses the Lyt2{sup a} and Lyt3{sup a} alleles, suggesting that a portion of chromosome 6 centromeric to the diabetes-susceptibility genetic region is derived from an ancestry common to AKR and, like AKR, the CD8{alpha} and CD8{Beta}3.1 (but not CD8{Beta}3.2) subunits are detected on the cell surface of T lymphocytes of the NOD mouse. Interestingly, though, the CD8{Beta}3.1 molecule may not be expressed in the NOD mouse to the same extent as it is expressed in the AKR/J mouse, suggesting the possibility that the NOD mouse possesses a defect somewhere between transcription and cell surface expression of the CD8{Beta} molecule. 36 refs., 5 figs.« less