skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Formation of FePt nanoparticles by organometallic synthesis

Abstract

Our interest in determining the mechanism of FePt nanoparticle formation has led to this study of the evolution of particle size and composition during synthesis. FePt nanoparticles were prepared by the simultaneous reduction of platinum acetylacetonate and thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl. During the course of the reaction, samples were removed and the particle structure, size, and composition were determined using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Early in the reaction the particles were Pt rich (greater than 95 at. % Pt) and as the reaction proceeded the Fe content increased to the target of 50%. The particle diameter increased from 3.1 to 4.6 nm during the reaction. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry measurements of individual particle compositions using a high resolution TEM showed a broad distribution of particle compositions with a standard deviation greater than 15% of the average composition.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870203, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982901
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2724330; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; IRON; IRON ALLOYS; NANOSTRUCTURES; ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; PARTICLE SIZE; PARTICLE STRUCTURE; PARTICLES; PLATINUM; PLATINUM ALLOYS; PYROLYSIS; REDUCTION; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SYNTHESIS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Bagaria, H. G., Johnson, D. T., Srivastava, C., Thompson, G. B., Shamsuzzoha, M., Nikles, D. E., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870202, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, School of Mines and Energy Development, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, and Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870336, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487. Formation of FePt nanoparticles by organometallic synthesis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2724330.
Bagaria, H. G., Johnson, D. T., Srivastava, C., Thompson, G. B., Shamsuzzoha, M., Nikles, D. E., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870202, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, School of Mines and Energy Development, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, & Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870336, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487. Formation of FePt nanoparticles by organometallic synthesis. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2724330.
Bagaria, H. G., Johnson, D. T., Srivastava, C., Thompson, G. B., Shamsuzzoha, M., Nikles, D. E., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870202, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, School of Mines and Energy Development, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, and Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870336, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487. Tue . "Formation of FePt nanoparticles by organometallic synthesis". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2724330.
@article{osti_20982901,
title = {Formation of FePt nanoparticles by organometallic synthesis},
author = {Bagaria, H. G. and Johnson, D. T. and Srivastava, C. and Thompson, G. B. and Shamsuzzoha, M. and Nikles, D. E. and Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870202, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and School of Mines and Energy Development, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870336, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487},
abstractNote = {Our interest in determining the mechanism of FePt nanoparticle formation has led to this study of the evolution of particle size and composition during synthesis. FePt nanoparticles were prepared by the simultaneous reduction of platinum acetylacetonate and thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl. During the course of the reaction, samples were removed and the particle structure, size, and composition were determined using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Early in the reaction the particles were Pt rich (greater than 95 at. % Pt) and as the reaction proceeded the Fe content increased to the target of 50%. The particle diameter increased from 3.1 to 4.6 nm during the reaction. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry measurements of individual particle compositions using a high resolution TEM showed a broad distribution of particle compositions with a standard deviation greater than 15% of the average composition.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2724330},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 10,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • A one-step synthesis of L10 FePt nanoparticles ca. 17.0 nm in diameter by reductive decomposition of the single-source precursor, FePt(CO)4dppmBr2, on a water-soluble support (Na2CO3) is demonstrated. Direct conversion of a FePt(CO)4dppmBr2/Na2CO3 composite to a L10 FePt/Na2CO3 nanocomposite occurs at 600 C under getter gas with metal-ion reduction and minimal nanoparticle coalescence. Triturating the resulting nanocomposite with water simultaneously dissolves the sodium carbonate solid support and precipitates the formed fct FePt nanoparticles. As-prepared FePt nanoparticles are ferromagnetic and exhibit coercivities of 14.5 kOe at 300 K and 21.8 kOe at 5 K. When capped by functionalized methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) surfactant molecules,more » as-prepared, polydisperse ferromagnetic FePt nanoparticles can be dispersed and size-selected by fractional precipitation.« less
  • Core/shell nanoparticles of Pd/Au and Pd/Au/FePt were synthesized with palladium (5 nm diameter), a gold shell (1-2 nm), and a FePt shell (2 nm). The synthetic control allowed the Pd/Au catalytic properties to be tuned by the shell thickness. The synthesis provides an indication for future development of multicomponent nanoparticles for advanced catalytic applications.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Partially ordered Fe{sub 53}Pt{sub 47} nanoparticles with size around 8 nm were prepared by the simultaneous decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl and platinum acetylacetonate. The high boiling point chemical, hexadecylamine, was used as a solvent, and 1-adamantanecarboxylic acid was used as a stabilizer. The reflux temperature of the solution could exceed 360 deg. C, where disordered FePt particles could be partially transformed into the ordered L1{sub 0} phase. A nonmagnetic mechanical stirrer was used in order to avoid agglomeration of the fct-FePt particles during synthesis. The particles were dispersed in toluene and films of the particles were cast onto silicon wafersmore » from the solution. X-ray diffraction patterns of as-made samples showed weak superlattice peaks, indicating partial chemical ordering of the Fe{sub 53}Pt{sub 47} particles. The room-temperature hysteresis loop of the as-made sample reveals a small coercivity ({approx}600 Oe) because of thermal fluctuations; however, the loop is wide open and hard to saturate. The remanence coercivity from the dcd curve is about 2.5 kOe, which is four times larger than the hysteresis coercivity. The large remanent to hysteresis coercivity ratio and the shapes of the hysteresis loop and dcd curve suggest a broad distribution of anisotropies in the partially ordered particles. By coating the ordered nanoparticles with a polymer binder, the easy axis of the particles could be aligned under an external field.« less