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Title: Surface-morphology evolution during growth-interrupt in situ annealing on GaAs(110) epitaxial layers

Abstract

Temperature and surface-coverage dependence of the evolution of surface morphology during growth-interrupt in situ annealing on GaAs epitaxial layers grown on the singular (110) cleaved edges by the cleaved-edge overgrowth method with molecular-beam epitaxy has been studied by means of atomic force microscopy. Annealing at substrate temperatures below 630 degree sign C produced atomically flat surfaces with characteristic islands or pits, depending on the surface coverage. The atomic flatness of the surfaces is enhanced with increasing annealing temperature owing to the enhanced adatom migration. At a higher annealing temperature of about 650 degree sign C, however, 2-monolayer-deep triangular pits with well-defined step edges due to Ga-atom desorption from the crystal appeared in the atomically flat surface. The growth-interrupt annealing temperature optimal for the formation of atomically flat GaAs(110) surfaces is therefore about 630 degree sign C.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, and CREST, JST, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982894
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2733763; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANNEALING; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CRYSTAL GROWTH; DESORPTION; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; LAYERS; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; MORPHOLOGY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SPECTROSCOPY; SUBSTRATES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K

Citation Formats

Yoshita, Masahiro, Akiyama, Hidefumi, Pfeiffer, Loren N., West, Ken W., and Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974. Surface-morphology evolution during growth-interrupt in situ annealing on GaAs(110) epitaxial layers. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2733763.
Yoshita, Masahiro, Akiyama, Hidefumi, Pfeiffer, Loren N., West, Ken W., & Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974. Surface-morphology evolution during growth-interrupt in situ annealing on GaAs(110) epitaxial layers. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733763.
Yoshita, Masahiro, Akiyama, Hidefumi, Pfeiffer, Loren N., West, Ken W., and Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974. Tue . "Surface-morphology evolution during growth-interrupt in situ annealing on GaAs(110) epitaxial layers". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2733763.
@article{osti_20982894,
title = {Surface-morphology evolution during growth-interrupt in situ annealing on GaAs(110) epitaxial layers},
author = {Yoshita, Masahiro and Akiyama, Hidefumi and Pfeiffer, Loren N. and West, Ken W. and Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974},
abstractNote = {Temperature and surface-coverage dependence of the evolution of surface morphology during growth-interrupt in situ annealing on GaAs epitaxial layers grown on the singular (110) cleaved edges by the cleaved-edge overgrowth method with molecular-beam epitaxy has been studied by means of atomic force microscopy. Annealing at substrate temperatures below 630 degree sign C produced atomically flat surfaces with characteristic islands or pits, depending on the surface coverage. The atomic flatness of the surfaces is enhanced with increasing annealing temperature owing to the enhanced adatom migration. At a higher annealing temperature of about 650 degree sign C, however, 2-monolayer-deep triangular pits with well-defined step edges due to Ga-atom desorption from the crystal appeared in the atomically flat surface. The growth-interrupt annealing temperature optimal for the formation of atomically flat GaAs(110) surfaces is therefore about 630 degree sign C.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2733763},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 10,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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