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Title: High gain oscillators: Pulse propagation and saturation

Abstract

Semianalytical formulas have been used to model the pulse propagation dynamics of low gain free electron laser oscillators. Most of the scaling relations, including pulse propagation effects, are limited to the low gain regime. We discuss the problem of oscillator devices operating with small signal gain coefficients larger than 1. We comment on the relevant physical aspects and show that gain and saturated power can be reproduced by a set of simple formulas, analogous to those employed for the low gain case.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. ENEA, Unita Tecnico Scientifica Tecnologie Fisiche Avanzate, Centro Ricerche Frascati, C.P. 65, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982873
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2435960; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; OSCILLATORS; PULSES; WAVE PROPAGATION

Citation Formats

Dattoli, G., Ottaviani, P. L., and Pagnutti, S. High gain oscillators: Pulse propagation and saturation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2435960.
Dattoli, G., Ottaviani, P. L., & Pagnutti, S. High gain oscillators: Pulse propagation and saturation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2435960.
Dattoli, G., Ottaviani, P. L., and Pagnutti, S. Tue . "High gain oscillators: Pulse propagation and saturation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2435960.
@article{osti_20982873,
title = {High gain oscillators: Pulse propagation and saturation},
author = {Dattoli, G. and Ottaviani, P. L. and Pagnutti, S.},
abstractNote = {Semianalytical formulas have been used to model the pulse propagation dynamics of low gain free electron laser oscillators. Most of the scaling relations, including pulse propagation effects, are limited to the low gain regime. We discuss the problem of oscillator devices operating with small signal gain coefficients larger than 1. We comment on the relevant physical aspects and show that gain and saturated power can be reproduced by a set of simple formulas, analogous to those employed for the low gain case.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2435960},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 10,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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