skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Wettability study of modified silicon dioxide surface using environmental scanning electron microscopy

Abstract

The wettability analysis is often used to characterize a surface in micro and nanometer scale. At these small scales, effects of the contact line tension are also expected to play a significant role. Wettability effect is studied using environmental scanning electron microscopy on silicon dioxide surface modified by a low-energy electron irradiation method. Electron-induced wettability variation and patterning at micrometer scale on silicon dioxide substrate allow investigating the contact angle dependence on the water droplet line curvature and calculating values of the line tension of a three-phase system (solid-liquid-vapor) of about 10{sup -9} J/m that is consistent with theoretical estimations. It is found that the sign of the line tension alters from positive for hydrophilic surface to negative for hydrophobic one.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 (Israel)
  2. (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982833
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2721945; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DROPLETS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; IRRADIATION; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SILICON OXIDES; SUBSTRATES; WETTABILITY

Citation Formats

Aronov, Daniel, Rosenman, Gil, Barkay, Zahava, and Wolfson Applied Materials Research Center, Tel Aviv University, 69978. Wettability study of modified silicon dioxide surface using environmental scanning electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2721945.
Aronov, Daniel, Rosenman, Gil, Barkay, Zahava, & Wolfson Applied Materials Research Center, Tel Aviv University, 69978. Wettability study of modified silicon dioxide surface using environmental scanning electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2721945.
Aronov, Daniel, Rosenman, Gil, Barkay, Zahava, and Wolfson Applied Materials Research Center, Tel Aviv University, 69978. Sun . "Wettability study of modified silicon dioxide surface using environmental scanning electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2721945.
@article{osti_20982833,
title = {Wettability study of modified silicon dioxide surface using environmental scanning electron microscopy},
author = {Aronov, Daniel and Rosenman, Gil and Barkay, Zahava and Wolfson Applied Materials Research Center, Tel Aviv University, 69978},
abstractNote = {The wettability analysis is often used to characterize a surface in micro and nanometer scale. At these small scales, effects of the contact line tension are also expected to play a significant role. Wettability effect is studied using environmental scanning electron microscopy on silicon dioxide surface modified by a low-energy electron irradiation method. Electron-induced wettability variation and patterning at micrometer scale on silicon dioxide substrate allow investigating the contact angle dependence on the water droplet line curvature and calculating values of the line tension of a three-phase system (solid-liquid-vapor) of about 10{sup -9} J/m that is consistent with theoretical estimations. It is found that the sign of the line tension alters from positive for hydrophilic surface to negative for hydrophobic one.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2721945},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Nanostructure investigation on the post implantation by Fe-B and NiFe-B on CVD diamond/Si(111) film have been studied by means of STEM related to their GMR phenomena. Two samples were investigated carefully, firstly sample is post NiFe-B at E=70keV and dose= 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} (denoted as A-E3D1). Secondly, is post FeB at E=20 keV and dose= 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} (denoted as B-E1D1). Based on FPP measurement at room temperature (RT) and H{sub applied} = 8 kOe, A-E3D1 sample has MR ratio almost 80% and MR ratio in B-E1D1 sample is 45%. Based on STEM-EDX investigation, there are two aspectsmore » of how MR ratio of A-E3D1 more higher than those of B-E1D1. Firstly, surface nanostructure on the top of A-E3D1 film is more grazing than on the top of B-E1D1. Analysis with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) equipped with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) the growth of amorphous carbon layer on top of the implanted diamond film with thickness around 100 nm and only 20 nm on the no implanted sample have observed. Boron atoms were found inside the carbon amorphous layer distributed homogenously. Secondly, oxygen content at the interface between diamond film and silicon substrate in sample A-E3D1 was lower than those in B-E1D1 sample. This condition gives the resistance value in A-E3D1 lower than value in B-E1D1. This result is close to the Raman Spectroscopy data measurement which obviously suggests changes on the Raman spectrum due to implantation related to Oxygen excitation from B-E1D1 sample.« less
  • The presence of native oxide on the surface of silicon nanoparticles is known to inhibit charge transport on the surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal that the particles in the printed silicon network have a wide range of sizes and shapes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the particle surfaces have mainly the (111)- and (100)-oriented planes which stabilizes against further oxidation of the particles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements at the O 1s-edge have been utilized to study the oxidation and local atomic structure of printed layers of silicon nanoparticles which were milledmore » for different times. XANES results reveal the presence of the +4 (SiO 2) oxidation state which tends towards the +2 (SiO) state for higher milling times. Si 2pXPS results indicate that the surfaces of the silicon nanoparticles in the printed layers are only partially oxidized and that all three sub-oxide, +1 (Si 2O), +2 (SiO) and +3 (Si 2O 3), states are present. The analysis of the change in the sub-oxide peaks of the silicon nanoparticles shows the dominance of the +4 state only for lower milling times.« less
  • Ti--6Al--4V alloy surfaces were examined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning Auger microprobe (SAM), and scanning electron microscopy before and after irradiation with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1.06 ..mu..m) operating at power levels between 0.25 and 9.0 W. At low power, where little melting occurs, much of the surface C contamination was removed. Also, thinning of the TiO/sub 2/ overlayer occurred as evidenced using XPS by the intensity increase of the metallic Ti peak compared to that of the oxide. Small amounts of TiC and TiN are also formed during irradiation. SAM images indicate a large loss of C andmore » O and a decrease in the TiO/sub 2/ with residual amounts of N and C present. Plots of normalized total XPS area versus watts for the C(1s), O(1s), Ti(2p), Al(2p), and N(1s) lines reveal that all of these elements reach a steady-state concentration at high power levels. Carbon decreases to 20% of the original amount found on the untreated surface. Nitrogen shows the largest percentage change reaching nearly three times greater than the untreated surface at low power levels.« less
  • Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior ofmore » individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.« less
  • The surface roughening of platinum foils thermally treated under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) has been studied by scanning electron microscopy. Formation of {similar to}1-{mu}m high roughness was observed on HCl-doped Pt foils which were thermally treated at 1073 K under UHV, whereas no roughening was observed on HCl-doped Pt foil treated at 673 K under UHV. Evacuation under low vacuum (10{sup {minus}2} Pa) at both 673 and 1073 K did not bring about the surface roughening of the HCl-doped Pt foil. In the absence of HCl doping there was never a surface roughening, even though the Pt foil was evacuated atmore » 1073 K under UHV. These results indicate that the surface roughening was attributable to an evolution of HCl from the HCl-doped Pt foil by the thermal treatment. It is clearly indicated that this surface roughening is closely related to the enhanced activity of Pt powder catalysts by UHV treatment.« less