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Title: Effect of liquid thickness on laser ablation efficiency

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of liquid thickness on laser ablation efficiency. Both Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) and free-running Er:YAG lasers were used to ablate polymethyl-methacrylate samples in the presence of a water layer. The thickness of the liquid layer varied from 500 {mu}m to 3 mm. Ablation performance as a function of liquid thickness for both lasers was quantitatively measured by optical coherence tomography. For the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, wet ablation produced up to three times greater ablation volume than dry ablation, and the ablation efficiency decreased with increase of liquid thickness. On the other hand, for the Er:YAG laser, wet ablation with a 500 {mu}m layer of water produced comparable ablation volume to dry ablation. Ablation performance decreased as the liquid layer thickness increased. Q-switched laser ablation assisted by a thin liquid layer efficiently augmented material removal, while ablation efficiency of a long-pulsed Er:YAG laser decreased as water thickness was increased.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982810
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2715746; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABLATION; ALUMINIUM OXIDES; FERRITE GARNETS; LAYERS; METHACRYLATES; NEODYMIUM LASERS; PERFORMANCE; TOMOGRAPHY; YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS

Citation Formats

Kang, Hyun Wook, and Welch, Ashley J. Effect of liquid thickness on laser ablation efficiency. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2715746.
Kang, Hyun Wook, & Welch, Ashley J. Effect of liquid thickness on laser ablation efficiency. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2715746.
Kang, Hyun Wook, and Welch, Ashley J. Sun . "Effect of liquid thickness on laser ablation efficiency". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2715746.
@article{osti_20982810,
title = {Effect of liquid thickness on laser ablation efficiency},
author = {Kang, Hyun Wook and Welch, Ashley J.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of liquid thickness on laser ablation efficiency. Both Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) and free-running Er:YAG lasers were used to ablate polymethyl-methacrylate samples in the presence of a water layer. The thickness of the liquid layer varied from 500 {mu}m to 3 mm. Ablation performance as a function of liquid thickness for both lasers was quantitatively measured by optical coherence tomography. For the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, wet ablation produced up to three times greater ablation volume than dry ablation, and the ablation efficiency decreased with increase of liquid thickness. On the other hand, for the Er:YAG laser, wet ablation with a 500 {mu}m layer of water produced comparable ablation volume to dry ablation. Ablation performance decreased as the liquid layer thickness increased. Q-switched laser ablation assisted by a thin liquid layer efficiently augmented material removal, while ablation efficiency of a long-pulsed Er:YAG laser decreased as water thickness was increased.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2715746},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
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