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Title: Low energy ion beam assisted deposition of a spin valve

Abstract

The spin dependent electron transport in giant magnetoresistive (GMR) multilayers is significantly affected by the atomic scale structure of their interfaces. Devices with atomically flat and chemically sharp interfaces are preferred for magnetic sensor and memory applications. Recent atomic simulations of the atom-by-atom assembly of these devices indicate that near optimal interfacial structures can be created using low energy, ion assisted vapor deposition techniques with ion energies in the 5-10 eV range. A recently developed biased target ion beam deposition system has been used to experimentally test this hypothesis. Prototypical Ta/NiFe/Co/Cu/Co/FeMn/Cu spin valve structures were first grown using (simultaneous) argon ion assistance during deposition of the Co/Cu/Co trilayer part of the spin valve multilayer. Assisting ion energies of around 10 eV resulted in structures with a 30% higher magnetoresistance ratio and significantly reduced coupling field compared to samples grown with no ion assistance or with ion energies above 15 eV. These results are consistent with the atomistic simulation predictions. Other promising ion assistance schemes identified by the simulations were then used to deposit the Ta, NiFe, FeMn, and the top copper layer. A near optimal strategy was identified that resulted in the further improvement of the GMR ratio.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982807
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2715751; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ARGON IONS; COBALT; COPPER; DEPOSITS; EV RANGE 01-10; EV RANGE 10-100; ION BEAMS; IRON COMPOUNDS; LAYERS; MAGNETORESISTANCE; MANGANESE COMPOUNDS; NICKEL COMPOUNDS; SIMULATION; SPIN; TANTALUM; VALVES

Citation Formats

Quan, J. J., Wolf, S. A., and Wadley, H. N. G. Low energy ion beam assisted deposition of a spin valve. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2715751.
Quan, J. J., Wolf, S. A., & Wadley, H. N. G. Low energy ion beam assisted deposition of a spin valve. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2715751.
Quan, J. J., Wolf, S. A., and Wadley, H. N. G. Sun . "Low energy ion beam assisted deposition of a spin valve". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2715751.
@article{osti_20982807,
title = {Low energy ion beam assisted deposition of a spin valve},
author = {Quan, J. J. and Wolf, S. A. and Wadley, H. N. G.},
abstractNote = {The spin dependent electron transport in giant magnetoresistive (GMR) multilayers is significantly affected by the atomic scale structure of their interfaces. Devices with atomically flat and chemically sharp interfaces are preferred for magnetic sensor and memory applications. Recent atomic simulations of the atom-by-atom assembly of these devices indicate that near optimal interfacial structures can be created using low energy, ion assisted vapor deposition techniques with ion energies in the 5-10 eV range. A recently developed biased target ion beam deposition system has been used to experimentally test this hypothesis. Prototypical Ta/NiFe/Co/Cu/Co/FeMn/Cu spin valve structures were first grown using (simultaneous) argon ion assistance during deposition of the Co/Cu/Co trilayer part of the spin valve multilayer. Assisting ion energies of around 10 eV resulted in structures with a 30% higher magnetoresistance ratio and significantly reduced coupling field compared to samples grown with no ion assistance or with ion energies above 15 eV. These results are consistent with the atomistic simulation predictions. Other promising ion assistance schemes identified by the simulations were then used to deposit the Ta, NiFe, FeMn, and the top copper layer. A near optimal strategy was identified that resulted in the further improvement of the GMR ratio.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2715751},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 7,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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