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Title: Supersonic jet deposition of silver nanoparticle aerosols: Correlations of impact conditions and film morphologies

Abstract

We describe experiments and modeling for the deposition of silver lines and films via the impaction of a silver nanoparticle aerosol delivered through a supersonic jet. The aerosol gas dynamics of the jet flow field, nanoparticle acceleration in the jet, and deposition by impaction onto the substrate were modeled for both a flat-plate nozzle and for a conical nozzle designed to obtain higher impaction velocities. We modeled nanoparticle dynamics for He, Ar, and N{sub 2} gasses, all initially at room temperature and 1 atm pressure, flowing through a 250 {mu}m orifice into vacuum with a pressure ratio of {approx}5000. Experiments were conducted to deposit silver nanoparticle aerosols under the same conditions as were modeled. The silver nanoparticles were generated by laser ablation of a flowing microparticle aerosol entrained in either He or Ar that produced nanoparticles 5-10 and 15-20 nm in diameter, respectively. Deposition was made onto an unheated substrate in vacuum. The morphology of the deposited films was determined by scanning electron microscope cross-section images and crystallite size was determined by x-ray diffraction analysis. The morphological features and crystallite size were correlated with the nanoparticle impaction velocity and impaction energy derived from the model. We found that, for amore » given gas type, the size of the grains and morphological features within the impacted films were similar to the size of the nanoparticles from which the films were formed. The density and the degree of consolidation of the films were highly dependent on the nanoparticle impaction velocity/energy and were highest for helium. Control of film morphology, grain size, and film density during supersonic impaction of nanoparticle aerosols are discussed in light of these results.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982778
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2710304; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABLATION; AEROSOLS; ARGON; CROSS SECTIONS; DEPOSITION; GRAIN SIZE; HELIUM; MORPHOLOGY; NANOSTRUCTURES; NITROGEN; PARTICLES; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SILVER; SIMULATION; SUBSTRATES; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; THIN FILMS; VAPORS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Huang, Chong, Nichols, William T., O'Brien, Daniel T., Becker, Michael F., Kovar, Desiderio, and Keto, John W.. Supersonic jet deposition of silver nanoparticle aerosols: Correlations of impact conditions and film morphologies. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2710304.
Huang, Chong, Nichols, William T., O'Brien, Daniel T., Becker, Michael F., Kovar, Desiderio, & Keto, John W.. Supersonic jet deposition of silver nanoparticle aerosols: Correlations of impact conditions and film morphologies. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2710304.
Huang, Chong, Nichols, William T., O'Brien, Daniel T., Becker, Michael F., Kovar, Desiderio, and Keto, John W.. Thu . "Supersonic jet deposition of silver nanoparticle aerosols: Correlations of impact conditions and film morphologies". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2710304.
@article{osti_20982778,
title = {Supersonic jet deposition of silver nanoparticle aerosols: Correlations of impact conditions and film morphologies},
author = {Huang, Chong and Nichols, William T. and O'Brien, Daniel T. and Becker, Michael F. and Kovar, Desiderio and Keto, John W.},
abstractNote = {We describe experiments and modeling for the deposition of silver lines and films via the impaction of a silver nanoparticle aerosol delivered through a supersonic jet. The aerosol gas dynamics of the jet flow field, nanoparticle acceleration in the jet, and deposition by impaction onto the substrate were modeled for both a flat-plate nozzle and for a conical nozzle designed to obtain higher impaction velocities. We modeled nanoparticle dynamics for He, Ar, and N{sub 2} gasses, all initially at room temperature and 1 atm pressure, flowing through a 250 {mu}m orifice into vacuum with a pressure ratio of {approx}5000. Experiments were conducted to deposit silver nanoparticle aerosols under the same conditions as were modeled. The silver nanoparticles were generated by laser ablation of a flowing microparticle aerosol entrained in either He or Ar that produced nanoparticles 5-10 and 15-20 nm in diameter, respectively. Deposition was made onto an unheated substrate in vacuum. The morphology of the deposited films was determined by scanning electron microscope cross-section images and crystallite size was determined by x-ray diffraction analysis. The morphological features and crystallite size were correlated with the nanoparticle impaction velocity and impaction energy derived from the model. We found that, for a given gas type, the size of the grains and morphological features within the impacted films were similar to the size of the nanoparticles from which the films were formed. The density and the degree of consolidation of the films were highly dependent on the nanoparticle impaction velocity/energy and were highest for helium. Control of film morphology, grain size, and film density during supersonic impaction of nanoparticle aerosols are discussed in light of these results.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2710304},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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